Quincy Mine

    The House of Three Faces

    The Pewabic Mine’s legacy is forever memorialized by the great copper bearing lode that shares its name. Unfortunately the young mine’s fate was not to be as fortunate as such a discovery would seem to predict, as the mineralization of the lode along the Pewabic’s property was not nearly as rich as had been hoped. It turned out that the real riches sat just to the south along property held by the Pewabic’s far more fortunate neighbor – the Quincy. This disparity reached it inevitable conclusion when in 1891 the Quincy purchased its former rival for the sum of a million dollars. Yet Quincy was interested in far more than just bragging rights. It was also looking to continue its pillaging of the Pewabic lode by utilizing its neighbor’s lands to push its mine further to the north along the same lode that had served it so well. Central to this plan was the re-opening of the Pewabic’s No.6 shaft, a shaft that would become more commonly known as “North Quincy”. Along with the new name came a new surface plant, built out of the remnants and ruins left behind by the abandoned Pewabic. Approaching the North Quincy today finds…