• north2

    Along the Three Hundred

    Hancock’s original plat was a mere five blocks long, bordered on both sides by mine-owned lands belonging to the Quincy on the east and the Hancock Mine to the west. On that western end would be located the village’s public entities – including its schools, town hall, and later the Finnish College. To the east the economic engine that was the Quincy Mill helped establish that end of the village as its commercial center, so much so that the village’s first fire hall was located at its heart. But as the village grew into a city that commercial corridor stretched westward …

  • base

    The Quincy Method (p3)

    Mining at its most basic level is nothing more than an exercise in transporting rock from one point to another. This process begins underground soon after the rock is blasted free from its subterrarian home as it is loaded into tram cars for transportation towards the nearest shaft. There it is transferred into skips and brought thousands of feet up to the surface. While it may seem that this would be the end of the journey, it has really just begun. Now the rock has to be moved to a stamp mill for processing – a complex that is often located miles from the …

  • six-outside

    A Visit with the Number Six

    The Quincy No.6 has been a regular staple on the pages of CCE, dating back to her first appearance in 2015. Yet the No.6 has an even longer history with the Copper Country, as she first arrived to the region over a century ago in the winter of 1912. She was the last steam engine to be purchased by the Quincy, and she was also its largest and most impressive. Her maker was the Baldwin Locomotive Works, her weight was over 56 tons and her skills included the ability to pull up to 40 fully loaded rock cars. Upon the mine’s …

  • frontview

    And Not A Drop to Drink (p1)

    The Calumet Brewery out in Lakeview served the residents of the Red Jacket metropolis for a quarter of a century, a history of brewing that was not without its setbacks. In fact the Calumet Brewery once was known as the Miswald Brewery, back when it was owned and operated by a pair of brothers out of Ontonagon. The brothers, however, suffered from an incurable case of bad luck and would suffer not just one disastrous fire in their brewing career, but three. First their original brewery in Ontonagon was destroyed, then their beer depot in L’Anse was burned to the ground. Then …

  • bonusposter

    Lost Hancock

    Our historic photographer Tom Roberts was quite the connoisseur of all things Hancock as most of the hundreds of his pictures I now have in my possession feature the old mining town and the mine that gave it birth. Those pictures span decades of time, from the 1960s up to the dawn of the 21st century. While a great deal of Tom’s pictures are of buildings and ruins that we still are familiar with today, a few showcase places that are no longer with us. Some of this missing items are places that I never even knew existed, places that have disappeared …

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    Top 10 Most Iconic Copper Country WPA Projects

    While the Great Depression greatly effected the entire nation during the 1930s, the Copper Empire was especially hard hit. As copper prices plummeted, mine after mine was forced to shut their doors and lay off their workforce. At the Depression’s peak virtually every mine, mill, and smelter in the region had closed its doors resulting in thousands of workers finding themselves out of work and without pay – nearly three fourths of the region’s population. To help combat this problem,  State and Federal governments instituted a series of publicly funded work projects designed to provide much needed employment to those effected. These projects were administered and funded by a revolving …