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    Quincy No. 4

    For most of Quincy’s early history the vast majority of its production came out of only two shafts – the NO. 2 and NO. 4. While it had originally opened up nine shafts along the copper-rich Pewabic lode, most were abandoned rather quickly once poorer ground was discovered. Because of ...

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    The Presbyterian

    Just outside of village limits atop property original owned by the C&H Mine sits a trio of small churches huddled together within a criss-cross of roads. Today this small little plot of land is often referred to “God’s Little Acre”, and a century ago it was known as Temple Square. ...

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    The Elusive Wolverine (p3)

    The Central Mill Ruins If one were to look at a map of the Keweenaw around the turn of the century you would find the peninsula’s lake shores dotted with an extensive collection of stamp mills, easily identifiable by the sprawling dark stamp sands fanning out from the shore. This ...

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    A Reverberatory Furnace

    When it was first built in 1898 Quincy’s furnace building was home to a total of four reverberatory furnaces. The furnaces had a combined monthly capacity of 1600 tons with each furnace having the capacity of smelting 36,000 pounds of mineral in a 24 hour period to produce an average ...

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    The Iroquois That Was

    Apparently at one time it was considered “current” to name your capitalistic embodiment after a native tribe, considering the surplus of such mines scattered along the Keweenaw (the Mohawk, Oneida, Delaware, Huron, Seneca, Ojibway). When C&H decided to open up its newest endeavor north of Mohawk it didn’t want to ...

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    Stamps, Jigs, and Wifleys

    The purpose of the Mohawk Mill – as with any stamp mill – was to separate the copper from the rock that incased it. The process relied on the differing physical properties of the two substances, specifically the weight and hardness. Copper was of a greater density then the igneous ...

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    The Top Ten Must-See Copper Country Ruins

    The realm of the old Copper Empire sprawls across a deceptively large area of land, its remnants scattered across all corners of the peninsula. Old ruins of mines and mills can be found almost anywhere, some buried deep in the wilderness while others can be found right along the roadside. ...

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