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    One Last Thing…

    Before leaving behind the old Gratiot Hoist we find one last interesting article that perks our curiosity. Sitting alongside the building’s north wall we find a series of squat concrete pedestals atop a small concrete pad, a collection of ruins that look to have been part of an old addition ...

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    Red Jacket Fire Hall (p1)

    Red Jacket’s first fire hall was built in 1875 in response to a disastrous fire that had destroyed most of the fledging town five years earlier. Quickly the town rebuilt, and within a few decades had grown into the region’s premier metropolitan area. With thousands of more residents and hundreds ...

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    A Trolley Ride (p4) – Electric Park

    While it may be nice to envision the rise of electric railways in terms of  private companies investing in the public good, in most cases electric railways were attempts by electric light companies to create additional demand for their power. At the dawn of electricity, the new  power source was ...

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    The Lower Level

    the smokestack from the lower level As we neared the edge of the second level, we looked down across a zone of destruction. The lower level was a mess, a tangle of concrete, reinforcing bars, steel beams, cables, and any other industrial material you could think of. There were no ...

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    Postscript

    The steel dam at Redridge was completed in November of 1901, and became only the second steel dam in the United States. It was preceded by the Ash Fork Dam in 1898 and followed by the larger Hauser Lake dam in 1907. The Hauser Lake dam was subsequently destroyed by ...

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    Anatomy of a Steel Dam (p1)

    Steel dam construction was flirted with only temporarily at the turn of the century, a time which the Redridge Dam owes for its existence. By 1900 the wood crib dam that had been built on the Salmon Trout River to supply water to the nearby Atlantic Mill had proved inadequate ...

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    The Top 10 Old Schools of the Copper Country

    The great Copper Empire was spread far and wide, its reach extending from the ragged peaks of the Porcupine Mountains to the rocky shores of the Keweenaw’s tip. Hundreds of mines and mills were once scattered all across this vast landscape, each complimented by small communities of workers’ housing. Often ...

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