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    The Name Game

    The Kearsarge Amygdaloid was home to more independent mines then probably any other load. No less then a dozen mines struck shafts along its length from the Cliff Range to Calumet. These included (from north to south) the Ojibway, Seneca, Gratiot, Mohawk, Ahmeek, Allouez, North Kearsarge, Wolverine, South Kearsarge, C&H, ...

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    A Ramp to Nowhere

    The Copper Range depot was built at the far eastern end of its rail yards, just a short distance from Houghton’s downtown and the bridge to Hancock. While close the depot had a geographic  disadvantage – it was located at the bottom of a steep hillside that bordered the city’s ...

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    Anatomy of a Trestle (p1)

    The three Firesteel Trestles found along the old Copper Range line north of Lake Mine are messages in a bottle, a living example of the kind of turn of the century technology that helped transform the Copper Country into one of the country’s premier mining districts. While trestles like them ...

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    The Tamarack Canal

    In 1882 the Tamarack Mine began the long and laborious task of digging over a mile into the earth in search of what it hoped would be the bottom reaches of the copper-rich Calumet Conglomerate lode. By 1887 the impossible became the possible, and the great riches of the lode ...

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    The Casting Plant (p1)

    When the new No.3/No.5 combo furnace was installed at the Quincy Smelting Works, a large component of the new system was an automatic casting mechanism. This machine was housed in a large steel-framed extension added to the east end of the No.5 furnace building, a structure known as the Casting ...

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    Scrapbook Friday: Postcard Edition (p1)

    Up until the middle of the 19th century private correspondence was limited to notes in sealed envelopes, that is until the first Postcards began to circulate in Germany around 1865. In the US, private issued postcards didn’t become permitted by law until 1898, but back then any message written on ...

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    Anatomy of the Underground

    The adit we discovered at Copper Falls in only part of a much larger labyrinth of tunnels and shafts that comprise a Copper Country mine. The copper rich rock that mines sought were localized and concentrated into areas called lodes. Due to the geological forces that shaped the Keweenaw, copper ...

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    The Top 10 Old Schools of the Copper Country

    The great Copper Empire was spread far and wide, its reach extending from the ragged peaks of the Porcupine Mountains to the rocky shores of the Keweenaw’s tip. Hundreds of mines and mills were once scattered all across this vast landscape, each complimented by small communities of workers’ housing. Often ...

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