• NEW: Lakeview and its Brewery

    Wandering the long-forgotten town of Lakeview, with a special look at its most famous resident - the Calumet Brewery.

  • Behind a Green Veil

    CCE explores the crumbling walls of a mystery ruin lying half shrouded in the Copper Country woods...

  • Now in HD...

    CCE tours some old schools of the Copper Country, via a collection of turn-of-the-century postcards.

  • Now in HD...

    CCE explores the masonry Gothic masterpiece that is Calumet's St. Anne's Church.

  • Now in HD...

    Explore Laurium's old Commercial School, housed in this quaint sandstone building known as the Contralto Block.

  • The Quincy Method (p4)

    We wrap up our in-depth tour of the Quincy No.2 Shaft/Rockhouse, this time taking a closer look at the building's shafthouse portion.

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    Downtown Mohawk (p1)

    When the Mohawk Mine first arrived to the scene in 1898 it found itself a half dozen miles away from the nearest commercial offerings, a problem for its workers living within the confines of the newly established mining location.  To provide for the daily commercial and social needs of those workers, a small downtown area developed along a block of Stanton Ave between 6th and 4th Streets. It was within these two blocks of land that the bulk of the town’s commercial and cultural institutions would take shape, including its schools, three of its churches, its bank, and its largest stores. …

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    C Shaft Terraces

    After our discovery down at the bast of the hill, it was readily apparent to us that the Michigan Mine’s “C” shaft was something altogether different then anything we have seen before. Instead of just one large rock house/ shaft house structure we were confronted instead with a bizarre world where the rock house’s rock bin has been ripped out and placed separately from the rest of the structure. No doubt this unique arrangement was due to the nature of the neighboring topography, which made accessing the actual rock house with a rail spur difficult if not impossible. Instead of …

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    Anatomy of a Trestle (p1)

    The three Firesteel Trestles found along the old Copper Range line north of Lake Mine are messages in a bottle, a living example of the kind of turn of the century technology that helped transform the Copper Country into one of the country’s premier mining districts. While trestles like them could once be found dotted all across the peninsula, after a century of abandonment and scrap drives only four such bridges still exist in their original form – three of which can be found here at the Firesteel River. But who could have asked for much more impressive representatives then …

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    The Jacobsville Docks (p3)

    As I’ve noted previously the Jacobsville region was home to five quarries at the peak of the brownstone’s popularity, four of which sat along the Lake Superior shore. So far we’ve visited the remains of three of these quarry docks, with only one still remaining to find. This particular quarry, however, sat a bit apart from its Jacobsville siblings, roughly two miles north-east of the village of Jacobsville. Being so far from the rest of the pack this particular quarry warranted the establishment of its own worker’s village, a small community known as Red Rock. Though today the old village …

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    Portage Lake

    I’ve featured this particular photo before here on CCE, but not nearly in such high resolution as it appears today. This is a shot overlooking Portage Lake, as seen from the perspective of the Dollar Peninsula. The structures seen in the center of the photo above belong to the Tamarack / Osceola smelter and wire mill. Dollar Bay sits just beyond. Though not nearly as clear and crisp as the photo I featured yesterday, the panoramic view provided in this image coupled with its high-definition resolution provides for a few interesting views of sights not normally seen in old photography …

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    Top 10 Most Iconic Copper Country WPA Projects

    While the Great Depression greatly effected the entire nation during the 1930s, the Copper Empire was especially hard hit. As copper prices plummeted, mine after mine was forced to shut their doors and lay off their workforce. At the Depression’s peak virtually every mine, mill, and smelter in the region had closed its doors resulting in thousands of workers finding themselves out of work and without pay – nearly three fourths of the region’s population. To help combat this problem,  State and Federal governments instituted a series of publicly funded work projects designed to provide much needed employment to those effected. These projects were administered and funded by a revolving …