Tag Archives: Shaft House

The Quincy Method (p4)

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As we’ve explored the soaring frame of the Quincy No.2 Shaft / Rockhouse we’ve largely concentrated our efforts on the rock handling components of the grand structure. Yet as its name implies the building has a secondary purpose as well, something a bit less extravagant as rock handling but important none-the-less. …

The Quincy Method (p3)

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Mining at its most basic level is nothing more than an exercise in transporting rock from one point to another. This process begins underground soon after the rock is blasted free from its subterrarian home as it is loaded into tram cars for transportation towards the nearest shaft. There it is transferred into skips …

The Quincy Method (p2)

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The Quincy Mine’s first foray into placing a rockhouse into its shafthouse was at the old Pewabic No.6, a shaft Quincy had acquired when it purchased its old neighbor in 1891. Known as the “North Quincy”, this shaft was far removed from the rest of the mine’s surface plant including its …

The Quincy Method (p1)

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In its infancy, copper mining in the Keweenaw was an especially labor intensive enterprise. In its most simplest form, mining was nothing more then hole digging and with little technological assistance available at the time those holes were dug primarily with men with shovels and wheelbarrows. When rock was encountered the shovels gave …

The Life and Times of Quincy No.2

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She came into this world in 1856, offspring to a struggling mine trying desperately to make ends meet. She was a twin, her sister next door erected the same year. She wasn’t the mine’s first, and despite her name wasn’t its second either. The Quincy Mine at the time already …

The Money Maker (p1)

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The narrow lands of the old Schoolcraft Mine property were surrounded on all sides by mines of a higher caliber, mines such as the Tamarack and C&H which seemed to find success at every turn. In contrast the  Schoolcraft – and its Centennial heir – never seemed to be so …

A Portal to the Depths

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While the colossus rock house foundations had deservedly garnered much of our earlier attention at the Lake Mine, our eyes had been redirected to another impressive mass of concrete sitting a bit apart from all the action. Based on its location we knew what it had to be, but the …

The Chief

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As the copper hunters descended down upon the upper peninsula they found themselves traveling across lands occupied by the Anishinaabe, a native people that came to the Lake Superior lands generations earlier. Those early industrialists were particularly intrigued by the Anishinaabe culture and language, and utilized native terminology to both …

The “B” Shaft

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The Minesoata was typical of early fissure copper mines in the region. Scattered and seemingly chaotic, the mine sunk nearly a dozen shafts along its holdings atop the north bluff. With such a rich mine precision and efficiency weren’t so important; when the copper was literally lying about your feet …

A Trimountain Postscript

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Though I was technically done with our tour of the Trimountain Mine after leaving the No.4’s hoist building, once again thanks to fellow explorer/historian Bruce Groeneveld we have a few more interesting views of the old mine yet to enjoy. These photos are a continuation to those I featured a …

In the Arcadian Style

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As I mentioned in yesterday’s post, the Trimountain Mine outfitted its shafts with structures and equipment acquired from the defunct Arcadian property. These items included three almost brand spanking new shaft / rock houses, which Trimountain proceeded to place atop three shafts of its own. While I’m not sure which …

The Many Faces of the No.2

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We had discussed earlier the oddities of Trimountain’s No.2 rock house, a building whose ruins spoke of a structure of much different configuration then the one the Sanborn maps describe. The overview map included with yesterday’s post illustrates that point, as the shaft rock house combination shown there looks nothing …

A Shaft House’s Remains

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Like many mines, the Trimountain utilized a combo shaft / rock house for their shafts. These buildings combined a stand alone shaft house – a building that traditionally only served to protect the shaft entrance from the elements – with a rock house, a building where rock coming up from …

The Caldwell (p1)

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The success of the C&H Mine atop the Calumet Conglomerate attracted a great deal of attention as well as the interest of numerous investors hoping to cash in on the lode’s apparent riches. This meant the lands to the south and north of C&H became very desirable real estate, and …

Tamarack No.2 in HO Scale

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After featuring Ian’s great line drawings of various Copper Country mine structures last week, I was immediately reminded of another great CC artist that also happens to be a reader of CCE. His name is David Karkoski, and his medium of choice is wood, plastic, and metal. David’s art is …

Tamarack No.3

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When the Tamarack Mine undertook the ambitious plan of mining the Calumet Conglomerate at depth, it was an incredibly risky and ambitious plan that had no contemporary counterpart. It was only blind faith that encouraged the investment in such a ludicrous scheme, faith in the experience and expertise of the …

The Number Two

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When Captain Hooper first took reins of the old Victoria property in 1881 he found a mine in disarray. Not only was it flooded, which was too be expected, but all the mine’s timbers had rotted away, the adit level had partially collapsed, and the shafts were crooked and haphazardly …

Calumet No.3

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Here’s a look at the Calumet No.3 shaft, or at least a part of it. It’s been capped in concrete, leaving behind just a manhole cover and this brick lined archway as proof of the old shaft’s existence. The Calumet Mine was of course one of the precursors to the …

Franklin Jr. Revisited

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It was in 1860 that the small mining location of Boston was born along a swampy stretch of land several miles north of Hancock. The mine in question was the Albany and Boston, which had attempted to mine a stretch of the Allouez Conglomerate. The ill-fated endeavor managed to build …

The Isle Royale No.6

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Isle Royale No. 6 The Isle Royale Mine originally opened in 1852, on a section of the Isle Royale lode squeezed between the Grand Portage to the north and the Huron on the south. By 1854 the mine was joined by a small stamp mill, joined to the mine by …

Guest Post: The Franklin Jr No.2

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This is the second guest post by fellow copper country explorer Brian Wereley, who has been kind enough to send me photos and commentary relating to his exploration of the Franklin Jr mine early this past spring. As I have noted before, CCE is open to anyone who wants to …

What Was Once Tecumseh No.2

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LaSalle No.2, previously known as Tecumseh No.2 The LaSalle Mine was a combination of two older mines – the Tecumseh and the Caldwell – that had simply taken those older shafts as its own (with some new numbering). The LaSalle held a total of 4 shafts, two on the Tecumseh …

Guest Post: Superior No.1

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From its earliest conception I had always envisioned CCE as a community gathering spot, where fellow Copper Country explorers could share information and swap stories about their own explorations. Towards that end I have had an open policy when it came to guest contributions – if you have any adventures, …

Trimountain No.1

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Of all the mines that had sunk shafts into the great Baltic Lode, the Trimountain could be considered the ugly ducking of the bunch. Besieged by mismanagement and difficult geography the mine was never able to fully take advantage of the copper bounty below its feet. From its establishment in …