• A Fallen Stack

    A Fallen Stack

    With the hoist and compressor foundations thoroughly investigated, we turned our attention to find the source of their energy – the boiler house. Old Sanborn maps show the boiler houses to be at...

  • The Quincy Pump House

    The Quincy Pump House

    This rather handsome small sandstone building along Hancock’s waterfront appears at first glance to be an old garage, one recently converted into a motor sports business. That assessment would b...

  • Of Rock and Sandstone…

    Of Rock and Sandstone…

    Out of the four main components of any mine (rock-house, shaft-house, hoist house, boiler house) the boiler house has by far been the most elusive to photograph. For a time we hadn’t come across...

  • No. 4 Boiler House (and Man-shaft)

    No. 4 Boiler House (and Man-shaft)

    Before the acquisition of the Pewabic Mine (which became North Quincy), the Quincy Mine consisted of a total of nine shafts. As time progressed and technology improved Quincy closed down most of these...

Quincy Mine

“One of the most celebrated and successful mines along the Keweenaw was “old reliable” atop Quincy hill. For almost a century and a half the mine produced 1.5 billion pounds of copper and paid its shareholders over 30 million dollars in dividends. But the mine’s reputation today ignores its very precarious and troubled beginnings. While the mine was established in 1846 – one of the Keweenaw’s earliest – it wouldn’t make a profit or pay a single dividend until almost 20 years later. Its early troubles stemmed from the lode Quincy first worked – the stubborn Quincy Lode. Although initially promising, the lode proved to be nothing but and mired the company in failure for decades. It wasn’t until the highly rich Pewabic lode was discovered nearby (around 1857) that the mine began to show promise. The rest is history.”

A Quincy Enigma

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Found in the shadow of the great Quincy No.2 shaft/rock house was this interesting wooden artifact partially obscured by a small evergreen tree. At first glance it looked to be some type of wooden pipe, leading out from the old ... More »

The Quincy Pump House

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This rather handsome small sandstone building along Hancock’s waterfront appears at first glance to be an old garage, one recently converted into a motor sports business. That assessment would be partially correct, considering the building’s previous tenant was indeed an ... More »

A Fallen Stack

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With the hoist and compressor foundations thoroughly investigated, we turned our attention to find the source of their energy – the boiler house. Old Sanborn maps show the boiler houses to be attached to the rear of the hoist/compressor complex, ... More »

Mesnard Compressor House

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After yesterday’s first post on our Mesnard exploration, readers pointed out the existence of a large group of ruins sitting just behind the modern structures we had featured. I had noticed those same ruins on aerial images myself (highlighted on ... More »

A Modern Mesnard

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After Quincy bought up the defunct Mesnard Mine in 1896 it re-opened one of its original shafts, which became Quincy No. 8. Quincy then erected atop of it a modern shaft-rock-house – but not as modern as the one that ... More »

Along the Old Pewabic (p3)

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Before the acquisition of the Pewabic Mine, Quincy operated only two shafts set only a few hundred feet apart. Because of this they only needed one centralized dry house to service both. The system worked wonderfully for years until Quincy ... More »

Along the Old Pewabic (p2)

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When Quincy acquired the Pewabic Mine it inherited an obsolete and dilapidated surface plant consisting of an old shaft/rock house, hoist house, a few carpentry shops and a boiler house. Quincy re-used as much as they could, but a few ... More »

Along the Old Pewabic (p1)

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If it wasn’t for the discovery of the Pewabic Lode by Quincy’s northern neighbor, “old reliable” may have never survived its misfortunes along the Quincy Lode. It didn’t take Quincy long to find the Pewabic’s extension onto its property and ... More »

Of Rock and Sandstone…

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Out of the four main components of any mine (rock-house, shaft-house, hoist house, boiler house) the boiler house has by far been the most elusive to photograph. For a time we hadn’t come across the remains of a single one, ... More »

The Quincy Shafts

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For most mines along the Keweenaw shaft numbering was simple. The first shaft you sunk was the No. 1. Every shaft after that was named sequentially – working your way along the lode. Going from north to south, or vice ... More »

Quincy No. 4

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For most of Quincy’s early history the vast majority of its production came out of only two shafts – the NO. 2 and NO. 4. While it had originally opened up nine shafts along the copper-rich Pewabic lode, most were ... More »

A Quincy Dry (p2)

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Attached to the south end of the dry house was a second much larger building. If it wasn’t in ruin it would appear to be simply part of the rest of the structure, but in it’s current state you could ... More »

A Quincy Dry House (p1)

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One of the most celebrated and successful mines along the Keweenaw was “old reliable” atop Quincy hill. For almost a century and a half the mine produced 1.5 billion pounds of copper and paid its shareholders over 30 million dollars ... More »