Quincy Mill

“The scope of the Quincy Mine operation is quickly illustrated by the continued expansion the Quincy Mill undertook at the end of the 19th century. At first Quincy built one mill here at the banks of Torch Lake complete with 5 stamping heads. Less then a decade later it built a second mill next door with three more stamp heads. Together, these two mills were capable of stamping over a million tons of rock per year, and producing over 25 million pounds of copper. But even that wasn’t enough. Due to the increased demand of copper during the first world war it became necessary to further expand the mills capacities with the construction of large additions to both buildings. At Quincy Mill No. 1, it is this concrete and brick filled structure that you see as you drive down M26. While the rest of the wooden mill quickly deteriorated over the decades since the mines closure – this more robust addition has managed to survive.”

The Lost Temple of the Red Metal King (p4)

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As we exited that dark dingy tunnel and made our way into the light we looked back at the temple ruins stretched out before us yet again. Stretched in front of us was the grand performance space, joined on its backside by the remains of a narrow seating hall. While …

The Lost Temple of the Red Metal King (p3)

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So far we’ve explored two rooms of the great temple. The first seemed to be some type of waiting room, while the second – found up a flight of stairs – was some type of audience chamber. This room was missing its far wall, its maw opened out onto a …

The Lost Temple of the Red Metal King (p2)

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The forsaken temple at the south end of Torch Lake lies shrouded within the embrace of the surrounding forest. From the looks of things it has done so for some time, its windows smashed, its walls crumbling, and its ceilings weeping. This ravages of time have scarred and scabbed over …

The Lost Temple of the Red Metal King (p1)

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Shrouded in a dense calico camouflage of  foliage lies the ragged and faded remnants of an old abandoned temple.What ancient civilization built it? What deity did it honor?  Our apprehension soared as we carefully hacked our way through the thick jungle at our feet and approached the forsaken structure in …

Where Freighters Roamed

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When it came to Quincy’s coal handling operation, the Coal Silo was just a middle man. The real star of the show was the company’s massive coal dock, which sat along shore  just east of the main boiler plant. The dock consisted of three main components. First there was the …

The Coal Silo

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From the back it looked to be some type of concrete silo, similar to one you’d find on a farm but with the addition of a rectangular box plastered on its backside. We’ve featured this odd structure once before here on CCE, and were unsure of its purpose at our …

Pieces Scattered About

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Alongside the old pump house remains stands a grove of trees. At the opposite end of the wooded area stands the mill’s boiler stacks, marking where the mill’s boiler house once stood. In addition to the pump and boiler houses, this grove of trees hides the remains of a few …

The Little Red Foundation

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Of all the resources required in any milling operation, water is the most prolific. Stamps were incredibly thirsty machines, as were the assortment of jigs and wash tables that accompanied them. The daily intake of these machines exceeded millions of gallons, thus requiring mills to install large water pumps on …

Something New and Something Old

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A drive along the shores of Torch Lake will inevitably bring to view the soaring concrete spire of an old smoke stack – it’s base concealed by a shroud of trees. Though seemingly alone the industrial remnant was once part of a vast milling complex that called this section of …

Quincy Turbine Illustrated

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While doing some spring cleaning around here I stumbled across a collection of drawings I did of the Quincy Stamp Mill Turbine Building. This building was built in 1921, to supply electric power to the Quincy Mills. Housed inside was a 2000 kw General Electric steam turbine, powered by the …

Mill No. 2

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It wasn’t long after the new stamp mill at Torch Lake was constructed what Quincy underwent a dramatic increase in production – due mostly to the rich ground being opened along the No. 2 shaft. At first Quincy simply added new stamp heads to its mill at Torch Lake – …

Water Tower

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Fire is always a concern at a mine, both underground and on the surface. Before 1900 most infrastructure built for a mine was built from wood; wood shaft houses, wood trestles, wood collar houses, and wood stamp mills. While a fire at a mine was rare, a fire in a …

The Power Plant (p3)

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Making my way up to the top floor of the Turbine Building I found myself inside a concrete cathedral rising high above my head. This was a cavernous room a good two and a half stories in height with no internal support columns messing up the view. High above me …

The Power Plant (p2)

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Making our way inside the towering structure of the turbine building we find ourselves in what must have been the buildings basement. Even with the large window openings gracing three of the walls, the entire floor was very dark and damp. Standing in the middle of the room was four …

The Power Plant (p1)

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sticking up from the trees stand the remains to the Quincy Mill’s turbine building, used to supply electricity to the mill There might have been no other place that celebrated steam power as flamboyantly then the Copper Country. Here almost everything was powered by steam, hoisting engines, stamps, trains, pumps, …

Cuts, Fills, Trestles and Rails

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part of the old trestle once used to deliver copper rock to the mill The copper rock stored in the large holding bins here at the back of the Quincy Mill was delivered by train, courtesy the Quincy and Torch Lake Railroad. These trains travelled from the mine up atop …

The Mill’s Wooden Half

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the Quincy Mill before the addition of the addition As originally built the new mill at Mason was built much like all other mills along the copper range; a wooden structure, built down a hillside in a step stair fashion. Building along a hillside allowed gravity to do most of …

Mill Machines: Dorr Thickener

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In order to further improve the milling process along the Copper Country mine companies began to turn to newly developed chemical processes for use in their mills. While the purity of Copper Country Copper did not necessarily require such measures (knocking off all the non-copper rock from the copper was …

The Second Floor

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Before leaving the second floor of the stamp mill we take a few more wide looks at what remains. At this point the new addition, built from brick and concrete, butts up against the original mill built from wood. The wood structure has long since disintegrated, which leaves an obvious …

Mill Machines: The Wilfley Table

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For most of the Copper Country’s history the milling process has been very inefficient. For every ton of copper recovered, dozens of pounds more slipped past and found its way to the waste launders. At the Quincy mills the process was so inefficient that the company was able to live …

Mill Machines: The Frue Vanner

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EDIT: According to several readers with more knowledge on the subject then I, the machine remains pictured in the following post is not a frue vanner after all. Instead it seems that it most likely was a classifier used to sort middlings coming off the jigs or wash tables. So …

Floors and Ceilings

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looking up the old skylight of the Quincy Mill – almost a century since the glass was first installed Taking a ginger walk up the concrete stairway up to the second level of the Quincy Mill addition brought us to another room very similar to the first. Only the entire …