North Kearsarge No. 4

Copper City | , , ,

Significance

First started as an independent company in 1886, the Kearsarge was later bought up by the Osceola Consolidated Mining Company. The Osceola Mine operated the Kearsarge for over thirty years before it too was bought up by another mine company – C&H. Soon after the acquisition, C&H closed down the Kearsarge Mine as the Depression dawned, with its last skip of copper brought to the surface in 1931. But with the Second World War came a new beginning. Due to an increased demand for copper for the war effort and generous price controls set in place by the government, companies that managed to survive the Depression quickly ramped up production. For C&H this meant re-opening the Kearsarge Mine.

While C&H re-opened all shafts along the lode, it was the No. 4 that proved the most valuable to the war effort. This was due to the nature of the Kearsarge Lode itself, which became richer in copper as it moved north. As the mine’s northernmost shaft, the No. 4 ended up producing the bulk of the copper recovered during the war. Helping it along was one of the most modern surface plants of the mine, featuring a modern steel shaft-rockhouse, powerful hoisting plant, boiler complex with 150′ smokestack, and spacious brick machine shop.

Description

Today most of the No. 4 plant is in ruins, save its impressive sized machine shop, a story and a half brick structure lined with a generous amount of windows and topped by a short pitched gabled roof.

Contemporary Use

Today the old machine shop has been converted into a single family residence.

Public Access

Being a private residence the machine shop and surrounding property is private and off limits to the public. The building can be viewed slightly from the neighboring road however.

Directions

The Kearsarge No.4 sits just to the west of Copper City off of Copper City Road. From along US41 in Kearsarge, continue north out of town for about a mile before turning right onto Copper City Road just past the Allouez gas station. Half way down the road the old machine shop from the No. 4 can be viewed through the trees on the right.