Lake Linden

Copper Country Heritage Guide - Locations

The shores of Torch Lake were first settled around 1851 by French-Canadian lumberjacks who had arrived to pillage the great hardwood forests to the north. The wide and deep Traprock river that flowed nearby was well suited for floating logs down the valley, prompting a score of lumber mills to be built near the rivers mouth. The fledging settlements became the center of French Canadian culture in the Keweenaw – complete with French-language newspapers, schools and churches.

In 1867 the region would be changed forever with the arrival of C&H’s massive mill complex built along the north end of the lake. Along with the mills came thousands of immigrants from all across the world, diluting the regions rich French heritage and expanding the community substantially. The increase in population brought with it a wide variety of business as well, including the Bosch Brewery in 1874. But it would always be C&H that had the most influence in the town, bringing with it a form of corporate paternalism that it had perfected up the hill at Calumet. The company donated land for churches, built the village’s high school, and provided steam heat and water to many of its buildings. In return the company received content and grateful workers.

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C&H Pay Office

C&H Pay Office

Lake Linden – Along with its massive stamp mill complex C&H erected this simple brick building to provide administrative space for the mills as well as its pay office.

C&H Power House

C&H Power House

Lake Linden – Producing some 8000 KW’s of power, this electric generating plant provided electricity to not only C&H’s massive mill complex, but also the mine itself some six miles away.

C&H Stamp Mills

C&H Stamp Mills

Lake Linden – The C&H Stamp Mill complex was actually three mills in one: one mill for the Calumet Mine, one for the Hecla, and a reclamation plant to reprocess the tailings from both.

First Congregational Church

First Congregational Church

Lake Linden – Built in the Victorian “Stick Style” in 1887, this wood framed church served both workers and managers alike from the neighboring C&H Stamp Mills.

Lake Linden Power House

Lake Linden Power House

Lake Linden – One of two independent power stations built by the region’s premier private utility company – Peninsula Electric Light and Power Company – this old turbine building once provided power to both Lake Linden and neighboring Laurium and Calumet.

Lake Linden Village Hall

Lake Linden – This Romanesque Revival building was built in 1902 to house the fire department and village offices for the mill town of Lake Linden.

Maple Hill / Mt. Calvary Cemeteries

Lake Linden – These neighboring cemeteries were established to serve the lumber and mill towns within the Traprock Valley, and are home to some of the area’s earliest French Canadian pioneers.

St. Joseph's Church

St. Joseph’s Church

Lake Linden – Taking over a decade to build, this massive duel towered sandstone church served the valley’s French Canadian lumberers and mill workers.

Traprock Valley Railroad Trestle

Lake Linden – With C&H’s acquisition of several mines out of reach of its railroad, the C&H Line was extended eight miles from the mine’s mills at Lake Linden to Ahmeek – crossing over the county highway at this point.