Tag Archives: Smokestack

Worth the Price of Admission (p2)

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While impressive, the old pump house ruins aren’t the only remains of the Conglomerate Mine operation to be found along the Delaware Mine surface tour. If you continue on past those ruins and follow the marked path farther into the surrounding forest you’ll soon find yourself looking out at an even …

Worth the Price of Admission (p1)

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Traveling into the Keweenaw northern reaches will eventually bring you to a large sign along the road adorned with the a small wooden shaft house. The sign directs your attention down a side road, noting the presence of a mine tour. Following its advice you find yourself rumbling along an …

Into the Woods

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After leaving the Baltic’s compressor house remains, we found ourselves drawn further into the woods thanks to this large piece of concrete hiding out in the thick foliage. Though at first only its top portion was visible, we could tell almost immediately that we had discovered the remains of one of the mine’s boiler …

Something New and Something Old

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A drive along the shores of Torch Lake will inevitably bring to view the soaring concrete spire of an old smoke stack – it’s base concealed by a shroud of trees. Though seemingly alone the industrial remnant was once part of a vast milling complex that called this section of …

Stacks and Trenches

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We return to the Chief, an old Ogima shaft more recently known as the Mass “C” shaft. We’ve featured the rusting bat cage now guarding the mine’s entrance before, but today we turn our attention to the soaring stack found in the background. This concrete monolith marks the Mass Mine’s …

Among the Coal Fields

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Stepping away from the hoist foundation we discover a scattering of concrete footings surrounding the building. These footings are adorned with pairs of iron bolts and are arranged in parallel lines stretching out from the building. We’ve seen these types of blocks before and they are almost always serve one …

The Stack

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The Lake Mine is a site of extremes, an obscene ruin-scape of boisterous monstrosity. Everything is bigger-then-life from its soaring concrete rock-house footings, protruding shaft collar, and impenetrable hoist house walls. Yet for all its grand showmanship the mine does exhibit a few less obtrusive features, most notable of which …

Copper Falls Mill Stack

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Deep within a twisted tangle of cedar and spruce bordering Owl Creek can be found this interesting artifact from a more industrious time. It lays broken and scattered within a deep ravine once traverse by an ancient stream. Painted with a deep rust hue, dented and damaged, and overgrown with …

The Chief

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As the copper hunters descended down upon the upper peninsula they found themselves traveling across lands occupied by the Anishinaabe, a native people that came to the Lake Superior lands generations earlier. Those early industrialists were particularly intrigued by the Anishinaabe culture and language, and utilized native terminology to both …

Around the Boiler House

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Standing in the middle of the massive sandstone fortifications surrounding us, we looked for more evidence of the boiler house the once sat atop this spot. Only there was nothing to find. Instead we turned our attention to the new opening in that wall we could see above us. The …

More Stacks and Boilers

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While the Minesota Mine may have been a self contained operation, the new Michigan Mine that took its place was not. This new mine was modern in almost every way, including its proclivity towards a modern lakeshore mill to process its ore. This required the services of a railroad, which …

Boiler House in C

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Approaching the town of Rockland from the east you find yourself traveling between a pair of parallel rugged hills. The hill to the south is marked on maps as South Bluff, while its neighbor to the north was known during the Minesota’s time fittingly as the North Bluff. At the …

The Bonus Boiler

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It sat just a bit farther into the forest, up atop the slight rise on which the machine shop and dry was perched along. We recognized it right away, though its existence at this location seemed rather odd. It was yet another boiler house. Perhaps more accurately I should say …

High Atop the Cliff

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Leaving the diverter behind, we followed its lead and headed upward to the top of the cliffs high above us. As we climbed we passed a few more remnants of cable stands, concrete footings half buried in the dirt and snow. Encouraged we toiled on, but was soon thwarted by …

What Was Once Lost Now Is Found

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It was the discovery of exposed copper within the rocky ledges of a rugged waterfall that gave birth to the Copper Falls mine – an enterprise that managed to produce nearly 13,000 tons of copper and pay out over $100,000 dollars in dividends during its lifetime. The mine’s success spawned …

The Seneca Boiler House

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After leaving the pipes and culverts of the Seneca Dam behind, we worked our way through the woods in search of our next destination: the Seneca No.1. Our sources had indicated that the mine should be just a short distance away from the old reservoir, but those sources hadn’t mentioned …

The Compressor House

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The Conglomerate Mine spared no expense in the construction of a formidable surface plant for its aspiring mine. Along with the usual collection of boilers and hoisting equipment, the company also built itself a seven mile railroad – complete with two locomotives and a generous supply of rock cars – …

The Rock House

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Leaving the Delaware’s superintendents house behind, we cut through the adjacent woods for a short spell before emerging on the edge of a large poor rock pile. The pile had been largely bulldozed flat, leaving a carpet of ragged red colored rock along the ground. The old rock pile sat …

Monuments to the Lost Empire

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My post about the Northwestern stamp mill and its still-standing smoke stack last week got me thinking about all the smoke stacks that are still standing across the Keweenaw – most of which I have featured here on CCE at one time or another. These modern-day obelisks serve as monuments …

The Stack from 1913

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Soon after the Arcadian’s demise its newly rebranded stamp mill – now known as the Centennial Mill – would become the recipient of a modern renovation. A major component of this refit was the addition of 3 more stamp heads to the mill’s original battery of 3, doubling both the …

The Ojibway Boiler House

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It was surprising that we hadn’t noticed it before, as large and monolithic as it was. Standing alone and set a few dozen feet away from the rest of the ruins was the brick “cube” seen in the photo above. Though unconventional in both shape and material, we knew what …

The Other Stack

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Standing 80 feet in the air, the concrete stack at the Franklin Jr. No.1 surface plant has become a Boston landmark, along with its brother across the street at the No.2. The two stacks stand tall over the swamplands surrounding Boston Pond and are the only reminders to the general …

A Phantom Stack

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At the beginning the Franklin Jr. concentrated the majority of its efforts along a northern extension of the Pewabic Lode, which happened to run across the old Albany and Boston property. But what at first seemed promising quickly turned out to be anything but. In response the Franklin Jr. turned …

The Other Stack that Clark Built

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Before becoming a French enterprise, and long before the influence of Mr. Estivant, the Clark Mine was just another small start up hoping to discover copper success under its small track of land. It was first worked in 1853, and later in 1855. By 1857 the small mine had only …