Tag Archives: Smelter

On the Waterfront (p6)

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The Quincy sands may have been a hazard to navigation, but they were particular convenient when it came time to construct a bridge across the Portage. Extending several hundred feet into the waterway, the presence of those sands meant a shorter distance of water to cross as well as a …

Smelters of the Copper Country

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As we noted in yesterdays post, smelting was a particularly costly enterprise that only became feasible once the mining industry of the peninsula had reached sufficient size and scope. That event occurred around 1880 with the establishment of the Portage Lake Smelting Works, and by the dawn of the 20th …

The Detroit and Lake Superior

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In the districts early years, most copper recovered from the peninsula’s depths were shipped almost straight out of the mine to points east for smelting and refining. Later as the mass mines emptied and companies turned to more finely distributed copper stamp mills began to take shape along lakes and …

The Other Stack that Clark Built

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Before becoming a French enterprise, and long before the influence of Mr. Estivant, the Clark Mine was just another small start up hoping to discover copper success under its small track of land. It was first worked in 1853, and later in 1855. By 1857 the small mine had only …

Welcome to the Quincy Smelter

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The Quincy Smelting Works is the last of the last, a lone remnant of an industrial juggernaut that once lined the Portage Waterway for miles. Like her shoreline brethren, the Quincy complex existed only to serve its copper masters, and when the copper empire died she died along with it. …