Tag Archives: School

It Stands Alone

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At the Copper Empire’s peak the greater Red Jacket area was home to some 30,000 people – an expansive population that required a great deal of public infrastructure to support. A large portion of that infrastructure dealt with education, as over 5,000 of the region’s residents were of school age. It was a …

The School Yard

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The small town of Mohawk is yet another one of the many old mining towns that can be found sprinkled about the old Copper Country, a collection of worker housing originally serving the town’s founder – the Mohawk Mining Company. After the Mohawk’s closure at the dawn of the Depression the town …

The Top 10 Old Schools of the Copper Country

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The great Copper Empire was spread far and wide, its reach extending from the ragged peaks of the Porcupine Mountains to the rocky shores of the Keweenaw’s tip. Hundreds of mines and mills were once scattered all across this vast landscape, each complimented by small communities of workers’ housing. Often …

The Gay School (p2)

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For the several hundred students who once attended the school in Gay, this would be their first view of their educational day. Morning bell brought kids through this main door, providing egress into the building they would spend the next 8 hours of their day. Though picturesque today, a century ago …

The Gay School (p1)

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The extreme remoteness of the Mohawk and Wolverine Mills along the Keweenaw’s South Shore meant that the accompanying village of Gay was a dozen miles of thick forest and sprawling swampland from the rest of the Copper Empire . Such remoteness meant that the village had to be incredibly self-reliant, with …

Lake Linden’s High School

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For a time Lake Linden’s school building was rather unremarkable; a simple wood framed building built in 1881 for a nominal sum by the C&H Mine. As the surrounding community grew, the school grew as well with several additions, alterations, and internal renovations. By the turn of the century, however …

The Mining Camp (p3)

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With a vested interest in nurturing a higher calibre of worker, mine companies like Copper Range actively supported institutions that did the same – places like churches and fraternal organizations that worked to instill a strong moral and civic duty in its participants. Yet mine companies didn’t stop at just nurturing …

The Central School

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With the discovery of the great Calumet Conglomerate Lode in 1864, the vast marshlands along the Keweenaw’s central plateau would be changed forever. From the once remote and swampy landscape rose a sprawling industrial complex – the Calumet and Hecla Mines – and with it a quickly growing community known …

Houses of Worship and Learning

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When it came to sheer numbers of houses of worship the booming metropolis of Calumet just was the undisputed champion of the region. Just after the turn of the century – at the Copper Empire’s peak – the bustling village found itself home to over 20 churches, a half dozen …

The Wright School

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The hillside on which the village of Hancock was platted was injurious  to its growth and expansion in the years that followed. Areas of developable  land was limited by the increasingly steep hill to the north and the deep waters of the Portage to the south, forcing the village to …

The Ryan School

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Thanks to the booming copper industry and the complimenting success of the Quincy Mine up atop the hill, the village of Hancock grew in leaps and bounds as it approached the dawn of a new century. The community’s precarious position alongside the steep hillside of Quincy Hill meant that any …

M.M. Morrison Elementary

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At its peak the Calumet township school system consisted of a high school, middle school, and over 17 elementary schools scattered arose the greater Calumet area. These satellite schools – most named after past U.S. presidents – were all built in a similar style and with an almost identical layout. …

The Town that Lumber Built (p2)

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Chassell was a town built by a single industry, much like most of the communities born in the Copper Country. Yet the industry from which the small town on Pike Bay was born – lumber – was a far cry from the empire which seeded the rest of the Keweenaw’s …

Back to School

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It was along the Sturgeon River at a point known as “Kings Landing” that the first settler to call Pelkie home first arrived. Later the area attracted a great deal of Finnish immigrants, who established farmsteads along the fertile banks of the river. Then the town was known as Kyro, …

Making a Statement

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Hancock’s original compliment of public schools were anchored by a large campus sitting in the heart of the city along Quincy Street. The first to be built was the classically inspired brick building seen above, erected to house the city’s secondary school in 1869. The building would soon be joined …

Some Old Schools of the Copper Country

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The great Copper Country needed labor to keep its engines running and the copper flowing. Luckily men from all around the globe gladly traveled to the region to help in that endeavor – their enthusiasm engorged with the promises of a better life in America. With those men came families, and later children. …

St. Joseph’s School

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It was 1881 when Lake Linden’s first parochial school began holding classes within the private home of Mrs. Pierre Pichette. The first class consisted of about 70 children, but as the village grew so too did the makeshift school. Five years later Mrs. Pichette’s school was instructing nearly 200 students, …

For the Children…

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The boom and bust cycles of the mining trade are rather legendary, and the pattern was no less vicious across the Keweenaw during the great copper rush preceding the civil war. At the beginning a flood of mines quickly sprang forth from the wilderness and along with them a collection …

St. Ignatius School

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By the end of the nineteenth century almost every Catholic church in the region had a complimenting parochial school. These schools – controlled and operated by the church – infused religious teachings with a standard grammar school lexicon. Usually limited in scope to primary education (though some larger parishes did …

A City Built for Copper

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While the great Calumet Conglomerate lode might have been getting the lion’s share of attention near the turn of the century in the Copper Country, a strong rival to the north was slowly coming into its own. The Kearsarge Amygdaloid was first pillaged by its namesake – the Kearsarge Mine …

Old Schools of the Copper Country (p3)

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The comforting arm of corporate paternalism wrapped itself around almost all aspects of community life in the Copper Country – including that of public education. While on paper school systems were municipally run and controlled by elected board-members, the heavy influence of the mine companies was palpable. Rural schools may …

Old Schools of the Copper Country (p2)

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While the Copper Country had its fair share of rural schools thanks to its Finnish immigrants, most schools in the region were found within the various towns and villages scattered across the peninsula. As the Copper Country grew and prospered, it wasn’t only single young men who called the area …

Old Schools of the Copper Country (p1)

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The history of the American rural education system has always been tied closely with the agriculture industry. Those rural folks making a living off the land the education of their children was usually subservient to the work required for a successful fall harvest. Children were often more useful to the …

Bricks and Stone

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If you follow one of the trails near the visitors center, you find yourself hiking up the steep bluff above the town to a simple sign in the woods. Although there isn’t much left to show for it, here once stood the old Central School. Like all mine locations, skilled …