Tag Archives: Rolling Stock

Forsaken No Longer

poster

The ruins at the Quincy Mine are incredibly diverse, running the gambit between massive rock houses and hoisting engines to small steam engines and underground rock cars. No matter the size or complexity, though, the Quincy Mine Hoist Association and its teams of like-minded volunteers work hard to preserve these …

Going a Little Loco

featured

Two weeks ago my Quincy Roundhouse update post garnered quite a bit of interest, especially in the old No.6 locomotive parked out front. There was some discussion as to the feasibility of its restoration, which according to local railroad guru (that’s my words not his) Chuck Pomazal won’t really be …

A Streetcar Revisited

featured

Several years ago during CCE’s informative early years we had come across the remains of an old trolley car rotting away in a field atop St. Louis Hill. For an early CC explorer it was an amazing find, and something completely unexpected and out of the ordinary. Well several years …

The Rails that Remain (p2)

featured

For a transportation system that could only operate over rails, railroads were incredibly dynamic. In the case of C&H, the miles of tracks on which its train ran were constantly rearranged and rerouted in response to the companies ever changing needs. As new shafts opened, new spur lines were quickly …

Scrapbook VII

featured

Its been a little slow lately with submissions for CCE’s Copper Country Scrapbook series, but the arrival of some great photos from contributer Bruce Groeneveld last week prompted me to throw together another chapter. We begin with those very same photos from Mr. Groeneveld… Bruce sent me these photos in …

More Quincy Rock Cars

featured

I would have to admit that after three years of exploring the Copper Country there isn’t too much that surprises me anymore. Hoist foundation? Check. Boiler Stack foundation? Check. Rock House foundation? Check. The list is the same each time, almost no matter where I go. But then there are …

A Typical Rock Car (p2)

featured

A typical stamp mill was a gravity-run operation, relying on gravity to do all the heavy lifting. To harness the power of gravity, stamp mills were normally built along the side of a steep hill in a step-stair fashion. Each “step” was another part in the process, with gravity transporting …

Derailed? (p2)

featured

If your looking off into the woods when walking the old Q&TL grade just east of the roundhouse you are bound to find the wrecked tender sitting upside down. Its rather large and hard to miss. The second car that sits wrecked nearby is a little harder to find. We …

Derailed? (p1)

featured

Today we revisit a site we have been to previously – the Quincy & Torch Lake Railroad. This railroad served the Quincy Mine, running ore and coal up and down Quincy Hill from the mine to the mill on Torch Lake. We had walked along this old rail line over …

Industrial Core

featured

looking across the industrial core in Calumet Sandwiched between the towns of Red Jacket (later Calumet) and Laurium was an immense industrial corridor stretching over a mile from the north side of Red Jacket as far south as Osceola. This was home to the great Calumet & Hecla mine and …

Russell Snow Plow #2

featured

Railroads that operated in northern climates have to operate is some extreme conditions for a good 6 months of the year. This was especially true here in the Keweenaw, where snowfall can easily top 300 inches a year. For a time Copper Country railroads relied on the standard method of …

Trolley in a Field

featured

The boom years that occurred at the turn of the 19th century quickly transformed Calumet and the surrounding communities into a modern metropolis. Electric lights, paved roads, modern plumbing, and even opera houses quietly ushered in a new modern era. The coming of the trolley line in 1901 yelled it …

A Train Forgotten

featured

The railroad we walked on was in operation for over 50 years. Lines of rock cars moved up and down it every day for all those yeas. Then, one day, it simply stopped. The workers simply left, leaving everything where it was. Some things were sold; some were dismantled. Other …

Mystery Mark

featured

We have seen our fair share of graffiti on the ruins and relics of the Keweenaw. But after a few hours along the Quincy and Torch Lake we found a recurring mark on the relics we were finding which begged further explanation then simple graffiti. Both the upside down tender …

An Abandoned Rail Car

featured

the quincy #2 complex as seen along the Q&TL Moving past the cog-rail, we rejoin the Quincy and Torch Lake Railroad on its journey east. High up on the hill beyond we could make out the silhouettes of the Quincy #2 complex, now the only remnants of a vast industrial …