Tag Archives: Pump House

Worth the Price of Admission (p1)

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Traveling into the Keweenaw northern reaches will eventually bring you to a large sign along the road adorned with the a small wooden shaft house. The sign directs your attention down a side road, noting the presence of a mine tour. Following its advice you find yourself rumbling along an …

The Little Red Foundation

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Of all the resources required in any milling operation, water is the most prolific. Stamps were incredibly thirsty machines, as were the assortment of jigs and wash tables that accompanied them. The daily intake of these machines exceeded millions of gallons, thus requiring mills to install large water pumps on …

In the Land of the Huron (p1)

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It was near the dawn of the Copper Country – 1853 to be exact – that a string of mines took up shop atop the newly discovered Isle Royale Mine in hopes of striking it rich. Most of these early mines – including the first Isle Royale – were failures …

The Quincy Pump House

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This rather handsome small sandstone building along Hancock’s waterfront appears at first glance to be an old garage, one recently converted into a motor sports business. That assessment would be partially correct, considering the building’s previous tenant was indeed an auto garage. The building served as a gas station for …

The Pump House

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While our mystery ruin stood right above us along that stretch of beach, the soaring sandstone cliffs in which is was encased put it out of our immediate reach. We were forced to retrace our steps back to the river mouth and make our way back up to the mill …

The Pit

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While massive hoist buildings are interesting, they are the type of thing we expect to find scattered about a mine site. What we found above, however, are things we don’t normally expect to find in our travels. From afar it looked to be a stone-lined pit dug into the earth, …

The Shore Plant (p1)

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Before the Arcadian Mill had become available, the Centennial Mine was desperately in need of a new stamp mill. Its original inland stamp mill at the mine itself was a relic of a earlier century and could no longer serve the mine’s growing needs. In desperation the mine bought up …

That Which Survives (p1)

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For the most part copper mines along the Keweenaw erected very modest surface plants, directing most of their money into the actual work of mining. Surface improvements were often considered wasteful embellishments, especially by investors looking to get large returns on their money. Mining was were money could be made, …

A Pump House and Crib

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The first Calumet Mill was a short lived diversion in what was otherwise an illustrious and profitable career for C&H. The roller’s that Agassiz had originally installed in the mill quickly proved inadequate in crushing the hard amygdaloid rock that the mine was encountering. Soon those rollers were replaced with …

Mohawk Mill Pump House

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This post was originally written not knowing that the ruins here are in fact those of the Mohawk Mill’s Pump House. Scroll down for an update Sitting just outside of Gay – north of the vast expanse of stamp sands along the shore – the fast and shallow Tobacco river …

Pump House (no2)

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an old water tunnel built to feed the mills pumps Stamp Mills required millions of gallons of water – every day – in order to operate. This enormous thirst necessitated a nearby water source and the construction of large steam-powered water pumps to transport that water to the mill. At …

Dock

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in service to the copper empire, perhaps… The Copper Country is a one industry town. For over a century the copper mine was king, and all things across the peninsula existed to serve it. Railroads existed to transport copper. Towns existed to house the workers. Businesses existed to serve the …