Tag Archives: Jig Floor

Unearthed (p2)

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Industrial Archeology is a discipline that studies the material evidence left behind from our industrial past. Considering the copious amount of industrial heritage to be found in the Keweenaw, its no surprise that Michigan Technological University offers students the chance to study in this field and obtain themselves a Masters …

On the Mill Floor

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While the wood frames we found scattered about the forest floor may or may have not been remnants of the mill’s Wifley tables, the tell-tale terraced foundation we had discovered nearby was definitely a sign we had finally stumbled across the Trimountain Mill itself. Following the step-staired foundation wall northward …

Guest Post: The Wolverine Mill (p2)

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The following guest post is contributed by Ian Tomashik, a sophomore at Dearborn High School outside of Detroit. Ian is a frequent Copper Country explorer with family ties to the region (his grandfather continues to live Mohawk). One of Ian’s frequent explorations took him to the little known ruins of …

The Terraces

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The milling process involved a series of intermediate steps which worked to liberate copper from its poor rock tomb organized into a series of terraced levels. At the top was the first step – stamping – performed by what are essentially steam driven hammers. Next the rock goes into a …

The Upper Floors

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Playing the role of both friend in foe in the tale of the Copper Empire is the omnipresent force of gravity. Out at the mine this ever present force required the installation of large and powerful machinery to properly overcome – at a large cost to the company. The deeper …

Anatomy of a Mill (Jigs)

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A long line of refining jigs at the Quincy Mill After leaving the final stages of the sizing process, the copper ore that entered the mill as pieces of rock have been reduced to a coarse gravel and mixed with water to become a muddy concoction known as slime. Within …

Mill No. 2

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It wasn’t long after the new stamp mill at Torch Lake was constructed what Quincy underwent a dramatic increase in production – due mostly to the rich ground being opened along the No. 2 shaft. At first Quincy simply added new stamp heads to its mill at Torch Lake – …

Return to Champion Mill

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I thought it fitting considering our return to the Champion Mine to take a another look at the Champion Mill as well. The Champion Mill site is one of our favorite – a place we like to return to as often as possible. It was a beautiful sunny spring day …

The Mill’s Wooden Half

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the Quincy Mill before the addition of the addition As originally built the new mill at Mason was built much like all other mills along the copper range; a wooden structure, built down a hillside in a step stair fashion. Building along a hillside allowed gravity to do most of …

Pillars

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Exiting the pump house, we found ourselves facing a long line of concrete pillars stretching out ahead of us. There were three sets laid out in parallel rows. The first consisted of a single square base – not a pillar really – sitting about two feet high. The next line …

The Second Level

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the second level, as viewed from the third Stamps were large, heavy, and cumbersome pieces of equipment. Most mills only had a few, and only the real profitable mines (such as C&H) could install more. The Mohawk Mill had 4 stamps. Only question was: where were they? Not that we …