Tag Archives: Dock

Where Freighters Roamed

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When it came to Quincy’s coal handling operation, the Coal Silo was just a middle man. The real star of the show was the company’s massive coal dock, which sat along shore  just east of the main boiler plant. The dock consisted of three main components. First there was the …

The Quarry Dock

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The great Copper Empire that once ruled the Keweenaw’s shores may have been figuratively built of copper, but it was literally built of another material mined from the peninsula – sandstone. For the last third of the nineteenth century this iron-stained stone was all the rage, and to meet demand …

Some Old Photos of Industry

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Continuing with our look at the 1904 “Souvenir of the Copper Country”, we now focus our attention on photos showcasing the empire itself – the copper industry. This is, of course, by far the favorite subject of the souvenir and there are numerous shots of mines, mills, and smelters to …

Down by the Docks (p8)

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The Carroll Foundry rests atop land partially created from the tailings of the Grand Portage Mill, which sat just to the west of it at the end of town. To the east of the foundry was located another mill, this one the Shelden-Columbian. Like its neighbor this mill also deposited …

Down by the Docks (p6) – The Warehouse District

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The first railroad to find its way to Houghton was the Marquette, Houghton and Ontonagon Railroad, which in 1883 built an extension of its line into the city from its former terminus in L’Anse. Unfortunately this was as far as rail traffic could go, as at that time the bridge …

On the Waterfront (p6)

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The Quincy sands may have been a hazard to navigation, but they were particular convenient when it came time to construct a bridge across the Portage. Extending several hundred feet into the waterway, the presence of those sands meant a shorter distance of water to cross as well as a …

On the Waterfront (p5) – The Quincy Sands

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With the Quincy Mill gone, the ragged landscape on which it once stood and the vast tailings that it had formed became a sprawling vacant lot. For a time Quincy continued to utilize its old stomping ground, as its docks were still located along the sands. But over time the …

Dockside at the Quincy Smelter

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After having been dug out of the ground, milled and smelted, copper’s last stop before leaving the region was one of several shipping docks found alongside the waterways of the peninsula. Here copper ingots, cakes and rods were piled high to wait for a ride on an outgoing freighter and …

The White City Legacy

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Though occurring over 600 miles away from the rocky shores of the Keweenaw, the 1893 World’s Fair left a lasting legacy upon the remote edge of the peninsula on which the old quarry town of Jacobsville can be found. The fair was held in Chicago’s Jackson Park, and was better …

The Jacobsville Docks (p3)

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As I’ve noted previously the Jacobsville region was home to five quarries at the peak of the brownstone’s popularity, four of which sat along the Lake Superior shore. So far we’ve visited the remains of three of these quarry docks, with only one still remaining to find. This particular quarry, …

The Jacobsville Docks (p2)

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The Jacobsville dock at its prime was a rather large and impressive structure, extending several hundred feet into the lake along a rather robust man-made peninsula. Along it’s top would have been a small tramway along with several large derricks all used to transport the cut stone blocks from the …

The Jacobsville Docks (p1)

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This winter CCE is collaborating with the Keweenaw Heritage Center in the creation of an exhibit featuring the Copper Country’s little known sandstone industry and the structures that industry built all across the midwest. In the course of that work, I was lucky enough to get a tour – via …

Along the Bay

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While the ore docks never materialized along Keweenaw Bay, the lighthouse at Sand Point was able to provide an important service none the less; to guide lumber boats into the bay to serve the region’s numerous lumber mills. These mills included the Hebard Mill at Pequaming, Bendry Mill at L’anse, …

The Shore Plant (p2)

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After a few small discoveries – including the remains of the original boiler house – we continued onward towards shore in the hopes to discover more remains of the Centennial Mill’s surface plant. It wasn’t long before we came across more remains hidden in the forest, remains belonging to the …

The Isle Royale Dock

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The growth and development of many communities up and down the Keweenaw was molded by the success or failure of an adjacent mine. For Calumet it was the massively successful C&H that pulled their strings. For Hancock it was the Quincy. For Houghton it would be the Isle Royale. Though …

Coal Dock

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the remains of the Quincy Mill’s coal dock Torch Lake sits at the southern end of the Traprock Valley, butted up against the rising ridge-line forming the Keweenaw’s spine. The 2700 acre lake is over 100 feet deep and home to over 200 million tons of stamp sand, dumped into …

Dock

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in service to the copper empire, perhaps… The Copper Country is a one industry town. For over a century the copper mine was king, and all things across the peninsula existed to serve it. Railroads existed to transport copper. Towns existed to house the workers. Businesses existed to serve the …