Tag Archives: Coal

Where Freighters Roamed

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When it came to Quincy’s coal handling operation, the Coal Silo was just a middle man. The real star of the show was the company’s massive coal dock, which sat along shore  just east of the main boiler plant. The dock consisted of three main components. First there was the …

The Coal Silo

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From the back it looked to be some type of concrete silo, similar to one you’d find on a farm but with the addition of a rectangular box plastered on its backside. We’ve featured this odd structure once before here on CCE, and were unsure of its purpose at our …

Some Old Photos of Industry

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Continuing with our look at the 1904 “Souvenir of the Copper Country”, we now focus our attention on photos showcasing the empire itself – the copper industry. This is, of course, by far the favorite subject of the souvenir and there are numerous shots of mines, mills, and smelters to …

On the Waterfront (p5) – The Quincy Sands

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With the Quincy Mill gone, the ragged landscape on which it once stood and the vast tailings that it had formed became a sprawling vacant lot. For a time Quincy continued to utilize its old stomping ground, as its docks were still located along the sands. But over time the …

Among the Coal Fields

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Stepping away from the hoist foundation we discover a scattering of concrete footings surrounding the building. These footings are adorned with pairs of iron bolts and are arranged in parallel lines stretching out from the building. We’ve seen these types of blocks before and they are almost always serve one …

In the Trenches

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By the time the mines of the southern range had come to fruition the convenience of utilizing neighboring Portage Lake for the complimenting mills had become unattainable, thanks to the government’s concern about the navigability of the Portage Canal. Thus the mines of the south were forced to search elsewhere …

Under a Canopy of Yellow

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Leaving the sandstone and brick embellished hoist foundation behind, we headed across the old roadway at the Trimountain No.2 to a ruin of a slightly different make. Instead of the calico draped foundations found earlier we found ourselves looking at a mammoth grey block of concrete rising up from the …

A Trestle Runs Through It?

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Accompanying any hoist is a boiler, a ruin that is always close nearby. Unfortunately most boiler ruins are rather skimpy affairs, with not much surviving to make an easy identification. Lucky for us, however, we would come across something that would make such and identification easy. Remains of a coal …

Mill Mine Junction (p3)

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While the Copper Range’s main yard was located down along the Houghton waterfront, one of the most active areas along the railroad’s 50+ miles of line could arguably be the crossing points at Mill Mine junction. In addition to the daily compliment of freight and passenger traffic, the junction also …

Coal Trestle

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After having taken some time exploring the remains of the Baltic’s compressor and boiler houses, we headed off into the woods to see what else we could uncover. It wasn’t long until we came across a looming concrete wall stretching along the hillside. Sitting about six feet in height, the …

Stuff

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more piling from the no2 dock at Quincy Mills After leaving the remains of the old boiler/pump house, we took a stroll around the wooded area area surrounding it. Also once sitting around here was the large coal shed, superintendents office, and a series of trestles and rail lines. Sitting …

The Silo

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the towering and mysterious Quincy Silo; purpose unknown Standing only a few dozen feet from the smokestacks was what first appeared to be yet another smokestack. This one concrete, half the height of the previous concrete tower, and much thicker at the base. Approaching it, however, we quickly noticed the …

Coal Dock

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the remains of the Quincy Mill’s coal dock Torch Lake sits at the southern end of the Traprock Valley, butted up against the rising ridge-line forming the Keweenaw’s spine. The 2700 acre lake is over 100 feet deep and home to over 200 million tons of stamp sand, dumped into …

South of Kearsarge

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a large pile of sandstone at the South Kearsarge Its been a very busy few weeks, and we haven’t gotten out as much to explore the copper country. The result of such scarce exploration has resulted in a scarcity in photos and adventures to tell of here. So to help …

Coal Delivery

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the approach to a trestle at North Kearsarge used to deliver coal to the boiler house In order to feed the mining hoists with steam, boilers required large amounts of fuel. Normally this would come in the form of coal, but for the Copper Country’s early years coal was a …

The Boiler House

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the boiler house at Quincy #2. Boiler houses converted water to steam using a coal fired boiler, sending the resulting steam to the hoist engine nearby. These buildings could be identified by their smokestack and train fed coal bunkers – such as shown here. Diagram courtesy HAER, Library of Congress. …