Tag Archives: Church

Jacob’s Temple

poster

Jacob Gartner was one of Hancock’s most prolific businessman, first arriving to the bustling mining town in the early 1880s. He and his 14 year old son got straight to work selling door-to-door as a street peddler. It was a vocation that Mr. Gartner proved highly skilled at, aided greatly by his ability to …

The Mining Camp (p2)

featured

As the Champion Mine prospered, scores of immigrants began moving into the houses built for them by the mine company. These immigrants came from a wide variety of countries, and brought with them their own cultures, traditions, and religious practices to the growing community.  In short order like-minded groups joined together …

The First Baptist

featured

In the early years of Laurium – then known confusingly as Calumet – one of the first churches to arrive to the scene was the First Baptist, formed around 1895. The congregation elected to build itself a small wood framed church along Hecla Street around the same time. The new …

Houses of Worship and Learning

featured

When it came to sheer numbers of houses of worship the booming metropolis of Calumet just was the undisputed champion of the region. Just after the turn of the century – at the Copper Empire’s peak – the bustling village found itself home to over 20 churches, a half dozen …

A Few More From Ahmeek

featured

The Ahmeek Mine grew out of the neighboring Seneca Mine, which set off the Ahmeek in 1880 to explore the Kearsarge Conglomerate lode. That lode was a bust, but a few decades later the far superior – and copper rich –  Kearsarge Amygdaloid lode was discovered. In 1903 a new …

The Presbyterian

featured

Just outside of village limits atop property original owned by the C&H Mine sits a trio of small churches huddled together within a criss-cross of roads. Today this small little plot of land is often referred to “God’s Little Acre”, and a century ago it was known as Temple Square. …

Saint Cecilia Church

featured

With the erection of the C&H smelter the small town of Grover quickly became inundated with those seeking employment in the new industry. As hundreds of workers – and their families- moved into the neighborhood they began to congregate around shared cultures and backgrounds. Soon those groups would build houses …

The Norwegian Lutheran Church

featured

The first Norwegian Lutheran Church was built in 1871, and was known as the Scandinavian Lutheran Church.  This was because the building not only served those hailing from Norway but all Scandinavians as well. The first church was built along Pine Street soon after, and four years later the congregation …

The Town that Lumber Built (p2)

featured

Chassell was a town built by a single industry, much like most of the communities born in the Copper Country. Yet the industry from which the small town on Pike Bay was born – lumber – was a far cry from the empire which seeded the rest of the Keweenaw’s …

St. Ignatius of Loyola

featured

In a region where Calumet was home to no less then six separate Roman Catholic churches, it seems odd to discover that Houghton could only muster one such house of worship of its own. But that thinking is based on a modern bias, as the roles of Houghton and Calumet …

Grace Methodist Church

featured

The old wood-framed church that served Grace Methodist Episcopal Church was nothing more then a room with four walls and a roof, hardly a structure representative of the region’s premiere Methodist congregation – known as the “mother church”.  Thus plans for a new masonry structure were begun in 1892, with …

The Churches of Houghton

featured

The great metropolises of the Copper Country were really limited to just two, each directly fueled by the region’s richest and most powerful mine companies. To the north the great C&H helped grow Red Jacket into the peninsulas most populous community, while along the Portage Valley old Reliable – Quincy …

A Few Old Churches

featured

Complimenting almost every mine location found across the Keweenaw was a line or two of homes and boarding houses that established a small mining location where workers would live. As the mine prospered and its future became more certain, that small group of houses would end up being joined by …

A Victorian Tapestry (p2)

victtap2

The rich tapestry of the St. Paul’s nave is impressive, but its true brilliance lies up front at the church’s sanctuary where the buildings artists and tradespeople assembled something truly stunning. First off is the main alter itself, a soaring cornucopia of carvings, sculpture and all the trimmings that rises …

The Art of St. Paul (p1)

featured

St. Paul the Apostle Church is the region’s largest and most opulent house of worship, its soaring twin spires and sandstone buttresses marking a stark contrast with the pedestrian banality of the neighborhood around it. Built by Red Jackets Austrian residents, this impressive building was one of the most expensive …

Scrapbook Friday: House of Worship Edition

featured

Continuing our theme from this week, I thought I’d showcase a few more houses of worship in this week’s scrapbook. Due to the variety of immigrants that arrived to the Keweenaw’s shores, the region boasts quite the collection of churches in its towns and villages. Almost every town had at …

A Tale of Two Churches (p2)

featured

In the fall of 1905 the village of Lake Linden was in full bloom, its population swelling and its downtown littered with modern stone and brick buildings. A brand new town hall had been completed years earlier, and its soaring bell tower had become a symbol of the village’s progress. …

A Tale of Two Churches (p1)

featured

The small lumber village of Torch Lake found itself thrust into the modern age with the arrival of C&H’s stamp mills in 1867. It was immediately greeted by an influx of immigrants in search of work at the new mills, and the village exploded in size. Now known as Lake …

A Survivor’s Story

featured

With the arrival of C&H’s mills to the area in the late 1860’s, what was once a predominantly French-Canadian community found itself besieged by a more diverse group of immigrants looking for work in the newly opened mills. As the village expanded in response, new organizations and businesses developed that …

An Old Church

featured

The passage of time has eroded away a great deal of the Copper Country’s heritage. While the sprawling infrastructure of the great Copper Empire may take up most of our time here on CCE, there has been much more allowed to vanish into history as time marched on. Most notable …

The Church That Time Forgot (p2)

featured

It was nearly 125 years ago that this simple wood-framed church outside of the small quarry town of Jacobsville housed its first services. In that time a lot has changed in the region, including the death of not only the local sandstone industry for which the church was built, but …

The Church that Time Forgot (p1)

featured

There was a time when Jacobsville was the center of much hustle and bustle, when the surrounding sandstone quarries were in full swing and the rumble of blasting and the clang from sledgehammers against wedges filled the air. Back then the town was joined by several other communities with names …

Through Colored Glass

featured

Tonight the Keweenaw Heritage Center will have its opening night reception, featuring yours truly as the guest speaker. I will be giving a talk on architectural heritage, featuring some of Calumet’s less known historical figures and their contributions to the village’s landscape. In honor of this event, I’ve preempted our …

St. Anne’s Revisited (p3)

featured

This Thursday the Keweenaw Heritage Center will have its opening night reception, featuring yours truly as the guest speaker. I will be giving a talk on architectural heritage, featuring some of Calumet’s less known historical figures and their contributions to the village’s landscape. In honor of this event, I’ve preempted …