Tag Archives: Boiler House

Worth the Price of Admission (p2)

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While impressive, the old pump house ruins aren’t the only remains of the Conglomerate Mine operation to be found along the Delaware Mine surface tour. If you continue on past those ruins and follow the marked path farther into the surrounding forest you’ll soon find yourself looking out at an even …

Worth the Price of Admission (p1)

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Traveling into the Keweenaw northern reaches will eventually bring you to a large sign along the road adorned with the a small wooden shaft house. The sign directs your attention down a side road, noting the presence of a mine tour. Following its advice you find yourself rumbling along an …

Anatomy of a Boiler House (p2)

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When we last left out unsung hero of the steam age we had finished exploring one of the building’s four main building blocks. While the design, layout, and equipment used within boiler houses varied, all catered to these basic components of steam production in one way or another. Essentially these components boil …

Anatomy of a Boiler House (p1)

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In the twilight years of the Victorian Age the great industrial revolution had given birth to some of the largest and most impressive steam powered engines the world had ever seen.  These monstrous machines could haul thousands of tons of freight by rail, cross the Atlantic in days, power cities, and haul rock from …

A Superior Boiler House

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The great Calumet and Hecla Mine was a monster. Its immense copper riches lying under its feet exceeded over 900 million pounds, worth nearly a quarter billion dollars in 1917. Each year the company would deliver some 17 million dollars worth, enough income to pay its expenses, pay out over 8 million dollars …

Into the Woods

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After leaving the Baltic’s compressor house remains, we found ourselves drawn further into the woods thanks to this large piece of concrete hiding out in the thick foliage. Though at first only its top portion was visible, we could tell almost immediately that we had discovered the remains of one of the mine’s boiler …

Hot Gases and Ash

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We featured a few of the more impressive structures remaining from the old Lake Mine in Ontonagon country already here on CCE, most impressive of which was the soaring towers of concrete on which the towering old rock house once stood. We also took a quick look at this small …

Stacks and Trenches

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We return to the Chief, an old Ogima shaft more recently known as the Mass “C” shaft. We’ve featured the rusting bat cage now guarding the mine’s entrance before, but today we turn our attention to the soaring stack found in the background. This concrete monolith marks the Mass Mine’s …

The Forgotten Boilers

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There are many like it to be found scattered across the region, a mine of such promise and hope that turns sharply into an endeavor of futility. In the case of the Carp Lake Mine, that promise wilted on a particularly difficult type of conglomerate embedded in sandstone. The mine …

Around the Boiler House

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Standing in the middle of the massive sandstone fortifications surrounding us, we looked for more evidence of the boiler house the once sat atop this spot. Only there was nothing to find. Instead we turned our attention to the new opening in that wall we could see above us. The …

The Great Wall

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So there we were, perched atop a high wall overlooking the forest floor a good dozen feel below us. Considering the coal conveyor led us to this unusual spot we assumed that below us we would find the mill’s boiler house. As to how we were to get down there, …

More Stacks and Boilers

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While the Minesota Mine may have been a self contained operation, the new Michigan Mine that took its place was not. This new mine was modern in almost every way, including its proclivity towards a modern lakeshore mill to process its ore. This required the services of a railroad, which …

Boiler House in C

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Approaching the town of Rockland from the east you find yourself traveling between a pair of parallel rugged hills. The hill to the south is marked on maps as South Bluff, while its neighbor to the north was known during the Minesota’s time fittingly as the North Bluff. At the …

The Bonus Boiler

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It sat just a bit farther into the forest, up atop the slight rise on which the machine shop and dry was perched along. We recognized it right away, though its existence at this location seemed rather odd. It was yet another boiler house. Perhaps more accurately I should say …

High Atop the Cliff

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Leaving the diverter behind, we followed its lead and headed upward to the top of the cliffs high above us. As we climbed we passed a few more remnants of cable stands, concrete footings half buried in the dirt and snow. Encouraged we toiled on, but was soon thwarted by …

Under a Canopy of Yellow

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Leaving the sandstone and brick embellished hoist foundation behind, we headed across the old roadway at the Trimountain No.2 to a ruin of a slightly different make. Instead of the calico draped foundations found earlier we found ourselves looking at a mammoth grey block of concrete rising up from the …

The Caldwell (p2)

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Knowing the location of the Caldwell’s No.1 shaft – otherwise known as the LaSalle No.5 – we had a pretty good idea as to were to find the rest of its surface plant. Making our job easier was an old overgrown road that led us directly to our destination- marked …

An Interesting Rock

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Before leaving the North Tamarack behind for good, there remained one last item of interest to feature here on CCE. It wasn’t a ruin, and its wasn’t some old artifact. Instead it was some type of rock. Or I should say it was a rather large boulder, though it didn’t …

Buried Bricks and Concrete Slabs

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There’s an odd item to be found in the picture of the old Tamarack No.3 surface plant seen above, something I missed the first few times going over it. It’s the presence of not one, not two, not even three, but FOUR smokestacks. How many boiler houses did the No.3 …

An Enigma Wrapped In Stone Walls

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It looked to be the ruins of a small building, only perhaps a few dozen feet in width. It consisted of a large stone wall standing about seven feet in height, covered in what looked to be a layer of black paint or possibly even some thin layer of tar …

A Trestle Runs Through It?

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Accompanying any hoist is a boiler, a ruin that is always close nearby. Unfortunately most boiler ruins are rather skimpy affairs, with not much surviving to make an easy identification. Lucky for us, however, we would come across something that would make such and identification easy. Remains of a coal …

The Spencer (p2)

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It didn’t take long for us to discover that we weren’t yet finished with the Spencer surface plant. In fact it seemed as if the engine house had never really ended, since sitting just past it we found yet another piece of an old foundation. This particular stone wall was …

What Was Once Lost Now Is Found

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It was the discovery of exposed copper within the rocky ledges of a rugged waterfall that gave birth to the Copper Falls mine – an enterprise that managed to produce nearly 13,000 tons of copper and pay out over $100,000 dollars in dividends during its lifetime. The mine’s success spawned …

The Seneca Boiler House

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After leaving the pipes and culverts of the Seneca Dam behind, we worked our way through the woods in search of our next destination: the Seneca No.1. Our sources had indicated that the mine should be just a short distance away from the old reservoir, but those sources hadn’t mentioned …