Tamarack Mills

Tamarack City | ,

Significance

Ever since John Daniell – a mine captain at the Osceola Mine – by the name of John Daniel conceived what would become the Tamarack Mine the two companies had been forever linked. Many of the Tamarack Mine’s investors were investors at the Osceola as well and many of the Tamarack’s agents and officers had also served at Osceola. When it came time for the Tamarack to build itself a mill it seemed obvious they would build right next to Osceola’s mills. The two mills even went as far as sharing a centralized pump house to supply their water needs. Finally when both mines became unhappy with the service provided by the Mineral Range Railroad, the two companies joined forces to create the Hancock & Calumet Railroad.

A total of four mills once stretched out upon the steep hillside here along Torch Lake, which were known collectively as the Tamarack Mills. The two Osceola Mills stood side by side to the south, while the two new Tamarack Mills stood alongside to the north. All the mills shared a common pump house, which supplied water from the lake. Atop the steep hillside ran a series of tracks of the Hancock and Calumet Railroad, which brought copper down from the companies’ mines up in Calumet. Meanwhile down along the shore the mills succeeded in dumping enough stamp sand to extends the shoreline by some 140 acres.

Description

Today the Tamarack mills have been reduced to nothing but a sprawling series of concrete foundations scattered across a hillside just south of Tamarack City. Besides the massive foundations which once supported the stamps and other machines of the mills, there are also remains of the numerous train trestles that once extended out over the mills.

Contemporary Use

The old mill foundations and buildings that remain from the Tamarack’s massive complex serve mainly as storage spaces for materials and equipment for various local businesses. The sprawling stamp sands that once fronted those mills have since been reclaimed; covered in top soil and planted with trees.

Public Access

The mill ruins sit on private property and are not open to the public. But their remains can clearly be seen along the hillside from the highway.

Directions

The remains of the Tamarack Mills sit up along the hillside west of Tamarack City. Follow M26 south from Lake Linden until leaving Tamarack City. As the road makes its long curve to the left, the mills will be on the right. The vast sands they created will be off to the left.