Northwestern Mine

“By the time the Central Mine began sinking its shafts deep within the interior of the peninsula, it was hardly a trailblazer. The rugged cliffs along which the great mine would prosper were already home to a mine – the Northwestern. In fact the Northwestern’s presence less then a quarter mile away from the newly established Central was a blessing for the new mine. Thanks to the Northwestern there were already a great deal of improvements to the landscape, including an established wagon road and a worker village complete with vacant and waiting homes to be filled by the Central’s arriving workforce. While the mines may have been competitors the two communities shared a more cooperative relationship as residents from Central would utilize Northwestern churches and stores. As the Central Mine prospered the Northwestern fizzled, and soon closed down. The old mine and its townsite would eventually be bought up by the Central.”

More from the Northwestern (p2)

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Our exploration of the old Northwestern Mine began at the old stamp mill, and has now turned back to the mine itself starting with the No.4 shaft. After checking out the capped shafts and the posts identifying it as the No.4, we turned our attention to another ruin sitting nearby. …

More from the Northwestern (p1)

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The Northwestern began its life of quite desperation in 1845 along a fissure vein just east of what would later become the Central. The vein was worked by a collection of four vertical shafts, each only a few hundred feet in depth. In addition to those shafts, an adit was …

The Northwestern Stack

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By the time the Central Mine began sinking its shafts deep within the interior of the peninsula, it was hardly a trailblazer. The rugged cliffs along which the great mine would prosper were already home to a mine – the Northwestern. In fact the Northwestern’s presence less then a quarter …