Michigan Tech

The Michigan School of Mines was established at the dawn of the Copper Empire’s reign across the Keweenaw, born from the burgeoning demand for trained engineers and mining professionals. In the beginning the young school was limited to holding classes in Houghton’s town hall, but by the turn of the century had grown large enough to warrant the establishment of an official campus. In response the school built its first building in 1889, known originally as State Hall but later became known as Hubbell Hall after one of the school’s primary benefactors. In the years to follow, Hubbell Hall would be joined by several more buildings, and by 1910 the campus would grow to encompass a total of seven main buildings and several support structures.

DHH

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By the time the dark cloud of the Depression descended upon the Copper Country the Michigan College of Mines had grown out of its diminutive first home on the top floor of Houghton’s fire hall and moved into an expansive campus of a half dozen beautiful masonry structures at the east end of …

Making Room For Progress

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In 1966 president Lyndon Johnson signed into law the National Historic Preservation Act, a particularly meaty piece of legislation that served to help identify and protect the nation’s inventory of historically significant resources. It was in many ways a reaction to the consequences of post-war “urban renewal” and “modernization” programs, …

The Michigan College of Mines (p3)

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For a decade the campus of the Michigan College of Mines remained frozen in time, anchored by the soaring tower of the college’s iconic main hall – Hubbell Hall. Joining that prestigious building was a company of stately structures each dedicated to a particular discipline within the college – one …

The Michigan College of Mines (p2)

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As the century turned and the Victorian age reached its twilight years, the Copper Country experienced a spring bloom as the mining industry in the region began to flourish. As the mines multiplied, so too did the need for trained mining engineers and technically skilled workers and the Michigan College …

The Michigan College of Mines (p1)

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What is known today as Michigan Technological University was born as the Michigan Mining School over a century ago in 1885. The fledging school was a modest institution of only four teachers and several dozen students operating out of rented space atop Houghton’s fire hall. As the Copper Empire grew …

Going Old School

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The Michigan School of Mines was established at the dawn of the Copper Empire’s reign across the Keweenaw, born from the burgeoning demand for trained engineers and mining professionals. In the beginning the young school was limited to holding classes in Houghton’s town hall, but by the turn of the …