Wolverine Mill

“The modern Wolverine Mill was opened in 1902 along the shores of Lake Superior near the burgeoning town of Gay. Built in the 1890’s to replace the mine’s original wood mill back at the mine site, this new structure was a smaller cousin of the Mohawk’s Mill – which was being built next door around the same time. True to the close partnership between the two John Stanton-operated mines, the mills shared a pump house and a superintendent, were built simultaneously, and closed within years of each other. The Wolverine would shut down 7 years before the Mohawk, in 1925.”

The Elusive Wolverine (p4)

wolverine0d

Though common at one time, the inland mill like the type utilized at the old Wolverine are something of a rarity in terms of ruins. Most of these early mills were built out of nothing more then wood, floors and all. Unlike their monstrous concrete and steel descendants of today, …

The Elusive Wolverine (p3)

featured

The Central Mill Ruins If one were to look at a map of the Keweenaw around the turn of the century you would find the peninsula’s lake shores dotted with an extensive collection of stamp mills, easily identifiable by the sprawling dark stamp sands fanning out from the shore. This …

The Elusive Wolverine (p2)

featured

The Wolverine Mine’s early years were tarnished by the same fallacy of thought that doomed countless other failed mines across the peninsula. For a time it was believed that the copper riches of the peninsula could be had as easily as panning gold from a river, that with very little …

The Elusive Wolverine (p1)

featured

Though largely overshadowed by C&H’s rapid rise to dominance at the end of the 19th century, there was for a time another rising star getting all the press in the Copper County. It was the “little mine that could”, a small upstart perched atop the recently discovered Kearsarge Lode just …

Guest Post: The Wolverine Mill (p2)

featured

The following guest post is contributed by Ian Tomashik, a sophomore at Dearborn High School outside of Detroit. Ian is a frequent Copper Country explorer with family ties to the region (his grandfather continues to live Mohawk). One of Ian’s frequent explorations took him to the little known ruins of …

Guest Post: The Wolverine Mill (p1)

featured

The following guest post is contributed by Ian Tomashik, a sophomore at Dearborn High School outside of Detroit. Ian is a frequent Copper Country explorer with family ties to the region (his grandfather continues to live Mohawk). One of Ian’s frequent explorations took him to the little known ruins of …