Hungarian Dam

As Torch Lake’s second largest tributary, the Hungarian Creek attracted a great deal of attention from mines planning to build mills on the lake. Perhaps more aptly described as a river, the waterway could provide large volumes of water during a good portion of the year. In fact, spring flooding along the Hungarian was all too familiar to the residents of Tamarack City, who had the misfortune of living along a sandy floodplain laid down by the creek hundreds of years ago. Mine companies knew that if the river could be tamed, it would become a valuable resource for any industrial complex built nearby. The first company to take advantage of this natural resource was the Tamarack, who built a long wooden launder down from the river to supply water to its new mill on Torch Lake. After the turn of the century the newly established Ahmeek Mine expanded on the Tamarack’s idea and built itself a 3 million gallon reservoir along the creek for its own mill – a dam that continues to stand still today.”

Hungarian Dam

A Hungarian Ruin

Before taking its tumultuous journey across the Keweenaw’s fractured spine, the Hungarian Creek begins its journey atop Dover Hill along…
Hungarian Dam

A Hungarian Dam (p1)

As Torch Lake’s second largest tributary, the Hungarian Creek attracted a great deal of attention from mines planning to build…
Hungarian Dam

A Hungarian Dam (p2)

I’ve been to the Hungarian Dam’s spillway several times, including a few times when the fence was missing and a…
Hungarian Dam

A Hungarian Spillway

The Hungarian dam is an embankment type, which is basically a man-made mound of dirt placed in the river’s way…
Hungarian Dam

A Hungarian Wall

Leaving the Hungarian Dam’s auxiliary spillway behind we proceeded to walk back down to the main river channel to see…
Hungarian Dam

Another Hungarian Dam

The Hungarian Dam was built in the late 1910’s and was a rather recent addition to a landscape that had…
Hungarian Dam

A Hungarian Overview

The Hungarian Creek descends a total of 361 feet from the top of its first falls down to the level…