Cliff Mill

“The Pittsburgh and Boston Company had the distinction of sinking the very first copper shaft in the Copper Country, into the hard rock along Hay’s Point in Copper Harbor. This early venture was a disaster, costing investors over $20,000 in the process. But they were not deterred, and turned towards a second piece of land south of Eagle River along the great soaring bluffs of the Cliff Range. This second attempt was a different story all-together, resulting in the first profitable copper mine in the Keweenaw. This would be, of course, the famous Cliff Mine.

The Cliff’s success was due mainly to its abundance of mass copper – large single pieces of copper ranging in size from a ton to more then a hundred. Three-quarters of all copper mined at the cliff were in the form of these massive boulders, all of which required very little if any milling before being sent out east to smelters. However copper in a more traditional form was also mined here, which required the construction of a small stamp mill on-site to process it.”

Unearthed (p3)

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The Warren Mill, built around 1910, was one of three stamp mills built at the old Cliff Mine during its history. The first of those mills burned down, the second demolished. The Warren, however, was simply left to rot away. For a time it was a tourist attraction of sorts, …

Unearthed (p2)

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Industrial Archeology is a discipline that studies the material evidence left behind from our industrial past. Considering the copious amount of industrial heritage to be found in the Keweenaw, its no surprise that Michigan Technological University offers students the chance to study in this field and obtain themselves a Masters …

Unearthed (p1)

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The great Cliff Range rising along the spine of the Keweenaw creates a formidable geographic barrier to the waters of the Eagle River, which caress the cliff’s base for several miles before finding a narrow gap at Phoenix through which to tumble down towards Lake Superior. At its west end, …

The Cliff Stamp Mill

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The Cliff Mine, several decades after closing The Pittsburgh and Boston Company had the distinction of sinking the very first copper shaft in the Copper Country, into the hard rock along Hay’s Point in Copper Harbor. This early venture was a disaster, costing investors over $20,000 in the process. But …