• A Legacy Less Celebrated

    A Legacy Less Celebrated

    Its been over half a century since copper mining was active in the Keweenaw, a timespan that tends to smooth over rough edges and gleam over blemishes. The industrial empire that once dominated the pe...

  • The Rocket Range

    The Rocket Range

    The tip of the Keweenaw is as remote and wild as you can get in the Keweenaw, situated over ten miles from any sign of civilization. The rugged landscape is challenging enough in the summer months, le...

  • The Revolution in the Valley

    The Revolution in the Valley

    The Keweenaw Peninsula garnered its name from the native population who referred to the long finger of land as “Kee-wi-wai-non- ing”, roughly translated as the “place where portage i...

  • Historic Bridges of the Copper Country

    Historic Bridges of the Copper Country

    After taking our look at the old Main Street Bridge in Eagle River, I thought we’d follow up with a brief look at several other historic bridges found across the Copper Country. While no bridge ...

Article

A Legacy Less Celebrated

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Its been over half a century since copper mining was active in the Keweenaw, a timespan that tends to smooth over rough edges and gleam over blemishes. The industrial empire that once dominated the peninsula’s landscape has since been reduced ... More »

The Rocket Range

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The tip of the Keweenaw is as remote and wild as you can get in the Keweenaw, situated over ten miles from any sign of civilization. The rugged landscape is challenging enough in the summer months, let alone the dark ... More »

The Revolution in the Valley

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The Keweenaw Peninsula garnered its name from the native population who referred to the long finger of land as “Kee-wi-wai-non- ing”, roughly translated as the “place where portage is made”. Those early people would forgo traveling around the long finger ... More »

A Few Old Churches

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Complimenting almost every mine location found across the Keweenaw was a line or two of homes and boarding houses that established a small mining location where workers would live. As the mine prospered and its future became more certain, that ... More »

Fading History

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Absent from the Copper Country for nearly a year we had just recently returned to do some work on our old house and prepare it for sale. As we expected very little seemed to have changed in the Keweenaw, and ... More »

CCE Top 100 (p4)

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In commemoration of my 1000th post, I thought I’d take some time this week to delve back into CCE’s rather extensive archives and highlight some of what I feel are CCE’s best posts – a full hundred of them. These ... More »

CCE Top 100 (p3)

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In commemoration of my 1000th post, I thought I’d take some time this week to delve back into CCE’s rather extensive archives and highlight some of what I feel are CCE’s best posts – a full hundred of them. These ... More »

CCE Top 100 (p2)

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In commemoration of my 1000th post, I thought I’d take some time this week to delve back into CCE’s rather extensive archives and highlight some of what I feel are CCE’s best posts – a full hundred of them. These ... More »

CCE Top 100 (p1)

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In commemoration of my 1000th post, I thought I’d take some time this week to delve back into CCE’s rather extensive archives and highlight some of what I feel are CCE’s best posts – a full hundred of them. These ... More »

One Thousand

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“If, a century ago, you were to leave Calumet for points further south you would hop a train at the Mineral Range Depot on Oak Street and ride the line south towards Hancock. After passing Swedetown on your right and ... More »

A Tale of Two Cities

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Over 10 billion pounds of copper has made it’s way out of the Copper Country over the last century, an amount with an estimated street value of nearly 2 billion dollars (in turn of the century dollars). Yet for having ... More »

A Short History Of Seneca

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The Seneca Mine began its life during the Copper Country’s adolescence – around 1860. Before then most mines across the peninsula were duds, lit off by excited investors only to fizzle away into nothing. Interest began to fade and new ... More »

Happy Birthday to CCE – with Video!

Today marks the third anniversary of CCE, which had its first post on this date back in 2006. On such an occasion as this I always like to show my appreciation to you - my readers. I don't have a great deal of mass appeal here at CCE, but that's made up easily by the outstanding group of regular readers that I do have that makes this all worth it in the end. Today CCE boasts over a hundred readers a day, with a solid following (that returns day after day) of over 50. While I appreciate all my readers, it's these dedicated few that I want to take the time to thank on this occasion. More »

Now Available: The Copper Empire (Vol I)

Over the course of human existence there has been several great empires that have left their mark on the civilized world. These empires managed to rise from nothing to become revered the world over, only to crumble to ruin almost as quickly. In the process these great civilizations left their mark on the history of man as well as on the land they once inhabited. Over the course of the last three years I have come to recognize yet another of these great civilizations right here along the shores of the Keweenaw - the great Copper Empire. More »

Welcome to the New CCE

First of all I would like to thank all of you for your patience during the last few weeks as I raced to finish the new site in time (I was only about 20 minutes late - not bad). It was a lot of work and more then a few late nights recently but the new site has finally arrived. But there's more changes yet to come, as I began writing the site's new daily content and start in CCE's new direction. More about that new direction later, for right now I thought I'd give a little tour of the site's new (and not so new) features. Let's begin... More »

A Note To My Readers…

I know for some of you the title of this post is somewhat ominous, as the last time I used it I was announcing my intention to shut down CCE permanently. At that time I was reaching a point financially and personally which made the task of keeping up with this site daunting if not insurmountable. Thankfully my loyal readers out there (and you all know who you are) made a convincing case for CCE's future, and prompted me to continue. Because of you, next month will begin my fourth year of Copper Country exploring. More »

Old Schools of the Copper Country (p3)

The comforting arm of corporate paternalism wrapped itself around almost all aspects of community life in the Copper Country - including that of public education. While on paper school systems were municipally run and controlled by elected board-members, the heavy influence of the mine companies was palpable. While rural schools may have been set up around the needs of agriculture, urban schools in the Copper Country's large communities were set up around the needs of mine companies. What mines needed were Americanized, English-speaking workers with skill sets necessary in an industrialized world. These type of students were something local schools were only too happy to produce - with the mine company's help of course. More »

Old Schools of the Copper Country (p2)

While the Copper Country had its fair share of rural schools thanks to its Finnish immigrants, most schools in the region were found within the various towns and villages scattered across the peninsula. As the Copper Country grew and prospered, it wasn't only single young men who called the area home. Soon married men, with families, began arriving with intentions of putting down roots. In turn, mine companies began to cater to these family men by building schools at their mine and mill locations. More »

Old Schools of the Copper Country (p1)

The history of the American rural education system has always been tied closely with the agriculture industry. Those rural folks making a living off the land the education of their children was usually subservient to the work required for a successful fall harvest. Children were often more useful to the family at home then at school, and most rural children never even bothered to attend regularly - much less finish. In the Copper Country rural education was looked upon in a much different manner - thanks mostly to the strong ethnic influence of its rural population. More »