Monthly Archives: September 2015

The Mining Camp (p4)

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The Champion Mine’s remote location brought with it many challenges when it came to building a community for its workforce. While many other mining locations northward were often a short trolley ride  from a major commercial center such as Hancock or Calumet, Painesdale was not nearly so lucky. At the time …

Scrapbook Fridays: Horizon is Bright Edition

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For this week’s Scrapbook Friday I thought we could return to the good old days once gain by means of the old C&H News and Views company newsletter (Thanks yet again Gordy!). This time he year is 1943 and the war in both Europe and the Pacific continues to wage. Back …

The Mining Camp (p3)

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With a vested interest in nurturing a higher calibre of worker, mine companies like Copper Range actively supported institutions that did the same – places like churches and fraternal organizations that worked to instill a strong moral and civic duty in its participants. Yet mine companies didn’t stop at just nurturing …

The Mining Camp (p2)

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As the Champion Mine prospered, scores of immigrants began moving into the houses built for them by the mine company. These immigrants came from a wide variety of countries, and brought with them their own cultures, traditions, and religious practices to the growing community.  In short order like-minded groups joined together …

Homeward Bound

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An integral component of any mining empire was the railroad. These iron beasts of burden worked tirelessly to transport materials between not only mines and mills but also between city and countryside and region to region. Though indispensable, they were not  immortal. As the empire died so too did the railroads, and …

The Mining Camp (p1)

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For decades the great Copper Rush stayed clear of the rugged hills lying just south of the Portage Valley, the only incursion of note being the Atlantic in 1872. It wasn’t until nearly a quarter century later the area’s true copper potential would be realized with the discovery of the Baltic …

Lost and Forgotten

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They stand silent and empty, sprinkled across a windswept field like discarded weapons from a war fought and lost long ago.  Yet these rotting hulks of iron and wood fought no battles and served no army. Instead these forsaken conscripts toiled in the service of industry, serving an empire ruled by copper. While today these machines may …

The Central School

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With the discovery of the great Calumet Conglomerate Lode in 1864, the vast marshlands along the Keweenaw’s central plateau would be changed forever. From the once remote and swampy landscape rose a sprawling industrial complex – the Calumet and Hecla Mines – and with it a quickly growing community known …

The First Baptist

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In the early years of Laurium – then known confusingly as Calumet – one of the first churches to arrive to the scene was the First Baptist, formed around 1895. The congregation elected to build itself a small wood framed church along Hecla Street around the same time. The new …