Monthly Archives: February 2015

The Presbyterian

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Just outside of village limits atop property original owned by the C&H Mine sits a trio of small churches huddled together within a criss-cross of roads. Today this small little plot of land is often referred to “God’s Little Acre”, and a century ago it was known as Temple Square. …

A Bosch Revival (p2)

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The great Lake Linden fire occurred at an almost serendipitous time for beer baron Joseph Bosch. The Torch Lake Brewery was a run-a-way success, and Bosch was profiting handsomely for it. For the son of a German brewer and an old mill worker  for C&H itself, such success was a …

A Bosch Revival (p1)

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While  the development of the old lumber town of Lake Linden may have been driven primarily by the great C&H Mine, it was also greatly influenced by a duo of prominent businessmen who were instrumental in the village’s growth. These were mercantile entrepenur William Harris, and beer baron Joseph Bosch. …

Scrapbook Fridays: Rails Edition

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It’s Friday and that means another installment of Copper Country Scrapbook. It’s been awhile since we’ve had a scrapbook post, and it hasn’t been for a lack of material. My hope is to get back on a schedule that I can keep, starting today. The installment for this week features …

The Champion Trestle

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When the Copper Range railroad first blazed its right-of-way through the southern range its route was far to the west of where the region’s main population centers are now located. That’s because at the time of its construction, the only mines in operation in the region was the Atlantic, its …

The Saint Cecila School

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While Hubbell may have had three churches, it was St. Cecilia’s that was by far the largest. Serving the town’s prominent French-Canadian population, the church grew to epic proportions in very little time.  With great numbers of parishioners comes the ability to finance a great deal of other works besides …

Saint Cecilia Church

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With the erection of the C&H smelter the small town of Grover quickly became inundated with those seeking employment in the new industry. As hundreds of workers – and their families- moved into the neighborhood they began to congregate around shared cultures and backgrounds. Soon those groups would build houses …

The Other Side of the Tracks

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The village of Grover was formed at the doorstep of C&H’s massive smelting complex along Torch Lake. By the time Grover became South Lake Linden the growing community had expanded westward up the hill and southward along the existing state highway. In doing so the village’s commercial district found itself …