Monthly Archives: January 2015

Old Town

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Hubbell was born from an industrial necessity , a requirement that insured the C&H smelter had its 400 man workforce needed to keep the furnaces burning. In an age of horse travel and a region of extreme winters, a workforce had to be located within close proximity to the place …

The Reding Store

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Nicholas Reding was a German immigrant who first arrived to this country at the young age of 16. Nicholas’s father was a successful merchant back in his home town of Luxemburg, and he hoped to carry on the tradition here in the new world. Of course to do that he …

In Fire’s Shadow

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The great fire of 1907 extremely altered the small community of Hubbell, clearing dozens of lots and providing a large expanse of open and available space for new building. In fact most of the village seen in the map above fell victim, clearing space all the way from the railroad …

An Opal in the Rough

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In the summer of 1907 the old town of Grover had grown into a sizable community of over at thousand people. Along the old state highway – Duncan Ave – a robust commercial district had developed, anchored by a general store, a grocery, and the rather large Hotel Bismarck and …

Now Available: The CCE Field Guide (Vol 1-3)

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After nearly nine years and 1200 posts CCE has amassed an incredible amount of information on the old Copper Empire, photographing and identifying hundreds of historic sites found all across the peninsula. The site has become a virtual encyclopedia of the copper country, an immense database of all the great …

The Only Bank in Town

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By the start of the twentieth century the  town formally known as South Lake Linden found itself with a beorgening commercial district absent one much needed player – a bank. While Lake Linden had a bank, it was a long two-mile trek for those in Hubbell who happened to require …

A Town With Three Names

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In the beginning it was the area’s innate natural wonder that first attracted men to Torch Lake. The native peoples used the lake for food, taking advantage of the lake’s abundance of fish. Later the region’s abundance of virgin timber attracted French-Canadian lumberjacks to the region, whose lumber mills built …