Monthly Archives: November 2014

Thank You!

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Thanksgiving is upon us, and in the spirit of the holiday I’d like to take a moment to give thanks to you – my readers. Since CCE has begun its annual fund-raising drive I am increasingly impressed by the incredible support of my readers. Each year I am overwhelmed by …

And So It Goes…

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History endures. It cannot be easily brushed aside, erased, or lost. It survives in the books and newspapers that recorded it and through the photos and films that documented it. It survives through the paintings and sculptures that interpreted it, and in the monuments and temples built to honor it. …

Helping Keep History Alive

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Each year at this time I reach out to my readers for their help. Around this time I write a post like this, an appeal for those that love this site to help insure its future. A common misconception about this site is that its created by a team of …

Unearthed (p3)

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The Warren Mill, built around 1910, was one of three stamp mills built at the old Cliff Mine during its history. The first of those mills burned down, the second demolished. The Warren, however, was simply left to rot away. For a time it was a tourist attraction of sorts, …

Unearthed (p2)

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Industrial Archeology is a discipline that studies the material evidence left behind from our industrial past. Considering the copious amount of industrial heritage to be found in the Keweenaw, its no surprise that Michigan Technological University offers students the chance to study in this field and obtain themselves a Masters …

Unearthed (p1)

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The great Cliff Range rising along the spine of the Keweenaw creates a formidable geographic barrier to the waters of the Eagle River, which caress the cliff’s base for several miles before finding a narrow gap at Phoenix through which to tumble down towards Lake Superior. At its west end, …

Where Freighters Roamed

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When it came to Quincy’s coal handling operation, the Coal Silo was just a middle man. The real star of the show was the company’s massive coal dock, which sat along shore  just east of the main boiler plant. The dock consisted of three main components. First there was the …

The Coal Silo

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From the back it looked to be some type of concrete silo, similar to one you’d find on a farm but with the addition of a rectangular box plastered on its backside. We’ve featured this odd structure once before here on CCE, and were unsure of its purpose at our …