Monthly Archives: October 2014

Pieces Scattered About

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Alongside the old pump house remains stands a grove of trees. At the opposite end of the wooded area stands the mill’s boiler stacks, marking where the mill’s boiler house once stood. In addition to the pump and boiler houses, this grove of trees hides the remains of a few …

The Little Red Foundation

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Of all the resources required in any milling operation, water is the most prolific. Stamps were incredibly thirsty machines, as were the assortment of jigs and wash tables that accompanied them. The daily intake of these machines exceeded millions of gallons, thus requiring mills to install large water pumps on …

Something New and Something Old

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A drive along the shores of Torch Lake will inevitably bring to view the soaring concrete spire of an old smoke stack – it’s base concealed by a shroud of trees. Though seemingly alone the industrial remnant was once part of a vast milling complex that called this section of …

Gone But Not Forgotten

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After the discovery of the great southern copper lode – the Baltic – companies rushed into the once remote and undeveloped region to cash in on the newly discovered riches. One of those pioneers wast the Champion, first established in 1899 before becoming part of the Copper Range empire a …

A Copper Range Crossing

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Taking a trip up Lake Linden Hill a traveler will find themselves passing under a squat viaduct crossing the highway, a crossing which once carried the C&H Railroad across the road on its way northward towards the Ahmeek Mine. The crossing is perhaps the region’s youngest, its current incarnation having …

The Wright School

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The hillside on which the village of Hancock was platted was injurious  to its growth and expansion in the years that followed. Areas of developable  land was limited by the increasingly steep hill to the north and the deep waters of the Portage to the south, forcing the village to …

The Ryan School

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Thanks to the booming copper industry and the complimenting success of the Quincy Mine up atop the hill, the village of Hancock grew in leaps and bounds as it approached the dawn of a new century. The community’s precarious position alongside the steep hillside of Quincy Hill meant that any …