Monthly Archives: June 2014

Another Houghton Depot

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When the Marquette, Houghton and Ontonagon Railroad arrived to Houghton around 1883 the line’s terminus was at the eastern outskirts of the city, several blocks distant from downtown. This small wood-framed structure sat along the line at the MH&O’s main rail yard at the base of the hill along College …

Down by the Docks (p6) – The Warehouse District

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The first railroad to find its way to Houghton was the Marquette, Houghton and Ontonagon Railroad, which in 1883 built an extension of its line into the city from its former terminus in L’Anse. Unfortunately this was as far as rail traffic could go, as at that time the bridge …

Down by the Docks (p5)

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Before the arrival of the first swing bridge over the canal, the waterfront area along the 100 block of Houghton’s Shelden Ave was nothing more then a back alley. At that point almost all of the land seen above didn’t even exist, as the original shoreline sat several dozen feet …

A Ramp to Nowhere

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The Copper Range depot was built at the far eastern end of its rail yards, just a short distance from Houghton’s downtown and the bridge to Hancock. While close the depot had a geographic  disadvantage – it was located at the bottom of a steep hillside that bordered the city’s …

The Copper Range Depot

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When the Copper Range reached its northern terminus at Houghton it built itself a sprawling lakeside rail yard just west the city. It complimented that yard with a passenger depot, but not just any depot. While along the rest of its tracks the company erected rather modest wood framed one-story …

Down by the Docks (p2) – The M. Van Orden Company

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Most people know it simply as “Chutes and Ladders”, a massive mountain of slides and stairways overlooking the Portage on Houghton’s west side. The park’s official name is Kestner Waterfront Park, a large green space that besides the playground also features a swimming beach, large pavilion and a long fishing …

Down by the Docks (p1)

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A pioneering New Yorker by the name of Ransom Shelden was one of the first white settlers to arrive to the Keweenaw – first taking up residence at the mouth of the Portage River in 1847 – a good decade before the village of Houghton or Hancock even existed.  Yet …