Monthly Archives: April 2014

City Center (p2)

stjoseph

As the 1920s approached Hancock was reaching its economic and cultural peak, the mining town rising to a level of power and influence second only to the sprawling metropolis of Red Jacket. By then Hancock was something more then a simple mining town on the frontiers of the Keweenaw wilderness, it had …

City Center (p1)

oneposter

The community of Hancock was given life by the Quincy Mine, whose agent Samuel Hill first platted the village in 1859. That original platt consisted of just 14 blocks, situated between the current streets of Reservation on the east and Montezuma to the west. In those early days the village …

The Legacy of James Dee

featured

There was much money to be had in in the Copper Country at the end of the nineteenth century, especially for those enterprising souls that could take advantage of a region in its infancy eager to embrace the modern age. One such man was a young Copper Country native by …

Copper Harbor Range

featured

After the discovery of copper in the Keweenaw by Douglass Houghton, the peninsula was soon inundated with a rush of prospectors and speculators all coming to its rocky shores to lay claim to the copper riches thought ripe for the picking. The predicted onslaught  garnered the attention of the government, …

The Town that Lumber Built (p2)

featured

Chassell was a town built by a single industry, much like most of the communities born in the Copper Country. Yet the industry from which the small town on Pike Bay was born – lumber – was a far cry from the empire which seeded the rest of the Keweenaw’s …

The Town That Lumber Built (p1)

featured

As the copper empire began to grow, so too did its demand for lumber. By the 1870s the booming mines and and burgeoning towns across the peninsula  were requiring large amounts of lumber to grow, with the Calumet and Hecla mines alone utilizing nearly 3 million feet board feet of …

Numbers One and Five

featured

When the Quincy Mill sat just a short mile down the hill all that was required to transport copper to it was a gravity-powered tramway. When the mill was moved six miles to the east, something a bit more extensive would be required. Thus was born the Quincy and Torch …