Monthly Archives: March 2013

Chassell State Bank

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The small town of Chassell was put on the map by the Sturgeon River Lumber Company, who built a large lumber operation on Pike Bay in 1888. For over a decade the company would harvest the plethora of pines in the region, floating them down the Sturgeon River (hence the …

Scrapbook Friday: House of Worship Edition

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Continuing our theme from this week, I thought I’d showcase a few more houses of worship in this week’s scrapbook. Due to the variety of immigrants that arrived to the Keweenaw’s shores, the region boasts quite the collection of churches in its towns and villages. Almost every town had at …

A Tale of Two Churches (p2)

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In the fall of 1905 the village of Lake Linden was in full bloom, its population swelling and its downtown littered with modern stone and brick buildings. A brand new town hall had been completed years earlier, and its soaring bell tower had become a symbol of the village’s progress. …

A Tale of Two Churches (p1)

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The small lumber village of Torch Lake found itself thrust into the modern age with the arrival of C&H’s stamp mills in 1867. It was immediately greeted by an influx of immigrants in search of work at the new mills, and the village exploded in size. Now known as Lake …

Scrapbook Friday: Notes on the Copper Country Edition

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“These notes are prepared primarily for the casual visitor to the Copper Country. They aim to give him some general idea of the history and character of the Lake Superior copper mines and some inkling of the work necessary to convert the copper in the ground into the commercial article.” …

The Elusive Wolverine (p4)

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Though common at one time, the inland mill like the type utilized at the old Wolverine are something of a rarity in terms of ruins. Most of these early mills were built out of nothing more then wood, floors and all. Unlike their monstrous concrete and steel descendants of today, …

The Elusive Wolverine (p3)

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The Central Mill Ruins If one were to look at a map of the Keweenaw around the turn of the century you would find the peninsula’s lake shores dotted with an extensive collection of stamp mills, easily identifiable by the sprawling dark stamp sands fanning out from the shore. This …

The Elusive Wolverine (p2)

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The Wolverine Mine’s early years were tarnished by the same fallacy of thought that doomed countless other failed mines across the peninsula. For a time it was believed that the copper riches of the peninsula could be had as easily as panning gold from a river, that with very little …

The Elusive Wolverine (p1)

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Though largely overshadowed by C&H’s rapid rise to dominance at the end of the 19th century, there was for a time another rising star getting all the press in the Copper County. It was the “little mine that could”, a small upstart perched atop the recently discovered Kearsarge Lode just …

Scrapbook Friday: Houghton Views Edition

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By now I’ve come to the realization that fellow reader and Copper Country enthusiast Paul Petosky has almost every single postcard of the Copper Country ever made, and he’s generous enough to share them all with the rest of us. (Thanks yet again Paul!) In fact I’ve received over a …

None Such Shaft

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The Nonesuch Mine was rather aptly named, as the unique character of its copper deposits made the operation a singular oddity in a region rather known for its geologic predictability. The copper here was extremely fine – more like sand grains really – and sat along a remarkable shallow dip …

Scrapbook Friday: Reliable Goods Low Prices Edition

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Today Copper Country Scrapbook has officially sold out, as we feature a series of copper country advertisements published at the turn of the century. These ads were found in “Our Boys in the Spanish American War”, a type of souvenir program published to commemorate the men of the Calumet Light …