Monthly Archives: November 2011

The Many Faces of the No.2

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We had discussed earlier the oddities of Trimountain’s No.2 rock house, a building whose ruins spoke of a structure of much different configuration then the one the Sanborn maps describe. The overview map included with yesterday’s post illustrates that point, ... More »

Even More Foundations

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With the compressor house ruins now behind us we had succeeded in exploring the majority of the Trimountain No.2′s surface plant; a collection that included the rock house, boiler house, hoist house, and the recently explored compressor house. All those ... More »

Even More Ruins

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The amount of ruins to be found at the old Trimountain No.2 site is a bit baffling, though in honesty the amount of old structures here is not substantially greater then other sites. It’s just that those buildings are scattered ... More »

Under a Canopy of Yellow

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Leaving the sandstone and brick embellished hoist foundation behind, we headed across the old roadway at the Trimountain No.2 to a ruin of a slightly different make. Instead of the calico draped foundations found earlier we found ourselves looking at ... More »

One More Look

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We’ve been here several times before, featuring this particular hoist two times here on the pages of CCE. Its a beauty, built in a refined old school style that utilized such classical touches as sandstone buttons and red brick frosting. ... More »

A Mine at Three Mountains

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The southern range’s first copper exploit was an ill fated attempt made along the base of Whealkate Mountain, one of several peaks rising high above the neighboring Portage Valley. That attempt ultimately failed, and it would take several more decades ... More »

Huron Creek Walls

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The city of Houghton sits along a rocky ridge defined by the Pilgrim River valley to the east and the Huron Creek gorge to the west. While the ridge descends rather steadily towards the Pilgrim River, it drops more precariously ... More »

St. Ignatius School

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By the end of the nineteenth century almost every Catholic church in the region had a complimenting parochial school. These schools – controlled and operated by the church – infused religious teachings with a standard grammar school lexicon. Usually limited ... More »

Return to the Union Building (p2)

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The sprawling exhibit space that has taken over the old Odd Fellow’s Hall consists primarily of an assortment of themed areas, each interpreting various facets of Copper Country life for those immigrants and natives that called Calumet home. Each interpretive ... More »

A Calumet Light Pole

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For some reason Calumet missed a great deal of the infrastructure improvements other great cities enjoyed during the past half century. Because of that a great deal of what you find in Calumet is hold outs from another time, relics ... More »

A Corner Lost in Time

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William Harris was one of Lake Linden’s most prominent citizens, having not only ran a successful mercantile business in town but also serving as the village’s first mayor. After the devastating fire of 1887 decimated twelve city blocks, Harris helped ... More »