Monthly Archives: August 2011

Tamarack No.2 in HO Scale

featured

After featuring Ian’s great line drawings of various Copper Country mine structures last week, I was immediately reminded of another great CC artist that also happens to be a reader of CCE. His name is David Karkoski, and his medium of choice is wood, plastic, and metal. David’s art is …

The Jacobsville Docks (p3)

featured

As I’ve noted previously the Jacobsville region was home to five quarries at the peak of the brownstone’s popularity, four of which sat along the Lake Superior shore. So far we’ve visited the remains of three of these quarry docks, with only one still remaining to find. This particular quarry, …

The Jacobsville Docks (p2)

featured

The Jacobsville dock at its prime was a rather large and impressive structure, extending several hundred feet into the lake along a rather robust man-made peninsula. Along it’s top would have been a small tramway along with several large derricks all used to transport the cut stone blocks from the …

The Jacobsville Docks (p1)

featured

This winter CCE is collaborating with the Keweenaw Heritage Center in the creation of an exhibit featuring the Copper Country’s little known sandstone industry and the structures that industry built all across the midwest. In the course of that work, I was lucky enough to get a tour – via …

A Bit More Detail

featured

While those drawings I featured yesterday – brilliantly done by High School student Ian Tomashik – show a great deal of insight into what several area mines may have looked like while in their full operational glory they only scratch the surface of the type of work Ian is capable …

A Different Perspective

featured

Several years ago I received an email from a reader who had sent me a remarkably detailed drawing of the Ahmeek No.2 surface plant, a ruin I had just finished exploring on CCE. The drawing was something I had always wished I could produce myself, a detailed rendition of the …

Cliff Drive Bridge

featured

Though most of us use it today as a scenic drive, Cliff Drive was once one of the peninsula’s main north-south transportation corridors. It was built by the Pittsburgh and Boston Mining Company to access its newly opened Cliff property, several miles west of the Phoenix. As more mines began …

What Is It?

featured

Time to play everyone’s favorite CCE game show – What Is It – where ordinary CCE readers attempt to identify a mystery object I’ve discovered during my explorations. Today’s mystery item is brought to you from the 800 block of Oak Street in Calumet, where it sits abandoned along the …

An Interesting Rock

featured

Before leaving the North Tamarack behind for good, there remained one last item of interest to feature here on CCE. It wasn’t a ruin, and its wasn’t some old artifact. Instead it was some type of rock. Or I should say it was a rather large boulder, though it didn’t …

Buried Bricks and Concrete Slabs

featured

There’s an odd item to be found in the picture of the old Tamarack No.3 surface plant seen above, something I missed the first few times going over it. It’s the presence of not one, not two, not even three, but FOUR smokestacks. How many boiler houses did the No.3 …

More to Explore

featured

Like most mine sites found across the Keweenaw, Tamarack No.3 is much more then just a rock house, some cable stands, and a hoist house. A wide assortment of surface structures all work together to ensure the efficient movement of men and materials in and out of a mine, and …

Five Years of CCE

It was five years ago yesterday - July 31st - that I published my first entry into what would become a daily on-line journal documenting the history and heritage of the great Copper Empire. Now I’m writing my 781st entry in that journal, and I have no idea what to write about. I had intended on approaching CCE’s five year anniversary with much fanfare, pomp and circumstance. I was going to have a special anniversary book prepared, one showcasing some of the site’s best work. It was going to sell like hotcakes. I was going to write up some profound statement to commemorate the day, and create some heartwarming memoir to go with it. I was going to make it matter.