Monthly Archives: March 2011

The Kitti House Revisited

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After posting my article on Oak Street’s 700 Block, I received an email from Henry Kitti’s great granddaughter – Sidney Butler – who actually still lives in the old Kitti house on the corner of 7th. She provided a few more photos of the old place, along with a bit …

Oak Street 800

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Though Oak Street continues on for another half mile into the neighboring communities of Yellow Jacket and Tamarack, our tour ends at Red Jacket village limit. Today that limit is 9th street, but lriginally the village ended further east at 7th street. At that time the land out here along …

Grichar’s Market (aka the Kitti Building)

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Our last stop along Oak’s 700 block is a rather small brick veneered building sitting on the corner of Cedar Lane – the alley the cuts through the center of the block. The building was originally built by the Kitti family (along with the rest of this side of the …

Oak Street 700

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Up until about 1890 the village of Red Jacket essentially ended at 7th street, with the land sitting past that being nothing but grazing fields. As the village expanded the vacant land on Oak’s western end became home to warehouses, churches, and a lumber yard – with a few homes …

The Nelson-Schroeder

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As Oak Street attracted more and more business, the old residential homes that once called the street home became a dying breed. Those that survived found themselves alone and isolated, squeezed between the oppressive bulks of business blocks. Such was the case of the house found at 607 Oak, home …

The St. Germain

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One of the first on the scene along Oak’s 600 block was a small two story brick veneered building with the dubious name of St. Jerman etched into its pediment – an unfortunate misspelling. The building’s actual name is the St. Germain block, which is a French name of some …

Oak Street 600

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the old H&C and new Mineral Range depot on Oak Oak Street’s rise to prominence was due mainly to the presence of the Mineral Range railroad’s passenger depot on the street’s eastern end. But the truth was that the Mineral Range was not the only rail line serving Red Jacket, …

Vertin’s Department Store

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The Vertin family immigrated to the Copper Country from Slovenia in the 1870’s, a small country south of Austria more recently identified with communist Yugoslavia. Instead of mining the enterprising family chose a career in retail instead, selling household goods door to door under the name of M. Vertin & …

The Hotel Michigan

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Since the village’s very beginning the corner of Oak and 6th has always been home to some form of transient housing. It started with the Anglo-American House, a low-rent boarding house that was built here as early as 1880, if not earlier. The Anglo was joined by a growing collection …

Oak Street 500

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While the arrival of rail service to Oak street influenced the street’s rise to power, an absence of available space along 5th street no doubt was a contributing factor. The crop of new hotels and boarding houses that the arrival or rail service spurred had no where to go but …

Oak Street 400

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map courtesy Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division Oak Street runs for 16 blocks, starting at Agassiz Park on Red Jacket’s east side and ending atop Tamarack Hill a mile to the west. At over a mile long the road is one of Red Jacket’s longest streets. But as …

Main Street Red Jacket

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The young village of Calumet – then known as Red Jacket – begun as a small community huddled around the Calumet and Hecla mines. As the neighboring mines grew and prospered, the small community found itself at the center of a mass influx of people looking for work and prosperity. …

A Country Church

Somewhere along the back roads of the Copper Country sits this nice little brick church. Considering its location far from any major town, it seems odd that it's built of brick. You would think such a country church would be built out of cheaper lumber. A generous donor perhaps? Now who out there knows where this quaint place of worship is located?

The Mine That Was

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South Kearsarge is one of those mines that seems to have faded into history. It’s a little mine that was upstaged by its neighbors in most regards, which is understandable considering the mine’s modest production. But the old Iroquois always had a special place in my heart, due mostly to …

The No.2

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When the old Iroquois property was bought up by Osceola the company had believed that the rich ground would be at the north end of the property, closer to the neighboring Wolverine mine. With this assumption in mind the mine sunk its first shaft at that end and built its …

An Odd Item

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After leaving the South Kearsarge’s compressor house ruins behind, we took a short walk through the surrounding woods to see what else could be discovered. It was during that short walk that we came across this odd and perplexing item… It appeared to be a simple concrete post about six …