Monthly Archives: February 2011

The Brick Yard

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When the Osceola started up the South Kearsarge it spared every expense it could with the mine’s surface accommodations. Most of the machinery was recycled from defunct Osceola shafts and the buildings themselves were made of wood. There would be no large stone buildings here as we would find at …

A Trestle Runs Through It?

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Accompanying any hoist is a boiler, a ruin that is always close nearby. Unfortunately most boiler ruins are rather skimpy affairs, with not much surviving to make an easy identification. Lucky for us, however, we would come across something that would make such and identification easy. Remains of a coal …

A Buffalo Connection

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When exploring the South Kearsarge ruins it doesn’t take long before the Osceola’s influence becomes strikingly clear. The most noticeable piece of evidence being the liberal use of Brush brand bricks. We’ve seen these familiar faces at all Osceola properties, including the North Kearsarge. These were apparently the brick of …

The Big Red “H”

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A sinking hoist can only get you so deep, and the No.1 shaft at South Kearsarge would end up reaching over 2800 feet before all was said and done. This required a much larger and more capable hoist then it had previously been afforded, which meant we were bound to …

Along Old Iroquois

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The Kearsarge Lode was first discovered by the original Kearsarge Mine – now known as the North Kearsarge – around 1887. While the lode’s namesake was unable to make much out of the find, its neighbor to the south had a bit more luck. This lucky mine was the Wolverine, …

A Copper Falls Map

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As I’ve noted before, Petherick Hill is littered with a fortune’s worth of old mine workings, over 35 shafts and adits when all is said and done. Though accessing a total of seven fissure veins and several miles worth of the Ashbed lode, all these openings were part of the …

A History of Copper Falls (p2)

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After two failed endeavors along two separate fissure veins atop Petherick Hill, the struggling Copper Falls Mine became desperate to find a paying lode on its massive land holdings. Luckily, the mine happens across yet another fissure struck across the hillside alongside the same creek from which the mine was …

A History of Copper Falls (p1)

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The Copper Falls mine was one of the regions pioneers, established when the government was still issuing land leases out of Porters Island. At this early stage the Keweenaw was still a rather remote and inaccessible land, and copper prospectors were limited by the rugged geography inherent of the peninsula. …

More Copper Falls Clues

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As I’ve noted before there isn’t a great deal left of the sprawling collection of mines that once occupied Petherick Hill. But that doesn’t mean there’s nothing left to collaborate those mines’ existence. Besides the recently featured Spencer ruins we’ve also showcases the old Copper Falls powder house as well …

Clues To The Underground

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More then a century after the last mine ceased operations along it’s slopes, Petherick Hill is still a rather wild and remote place. Just two roads cut across it’s face; Eagle Harbor Cut-Off to the north and a rather rugged dirt road that makes its way over the hill’s summit …

The Spencer (p2)

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It didn’t take long for us to discover that we weren’t yet finished with the Spencer surface plant. In fact it seemed as if the engine house had never really ended, since sitting just past it we found yet another piece of an old foundation. This particular stone wall was …

The Spencer (p1)

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The Copper Falls mine was a mine of many faces; an operation that mined several veins and lodes during its lifetime including the Ash Bed, Owl Creek, West, Child, and – of course – the Copper Falls veins. While the company wrestled copper from all these deposits, most of it’s …