Monthly Archives: October 2010

Mill Mine Junction (p1)

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When the Copper Range Railroad first blazed its trail through the southern range the region was still a wild and relatively empty land. The only mine operating in the area at the time was the Atlantic, and its own short-line hauler was the only rail line in existence. Initially the …

News & Views Thursday – Coal Shortage Edition

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This weeks ride in the DeLorean sends us back to July of 1946, in a time immediately following the close of World War II. C&H had just concluded a five week shut down due a strike-imposed coal shortage and operations were just beginning to resume. The photo above documents the …

A Few More of Allouez No.3

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Paul Meier brings us more old-school views of Copper Country mines, this time with a look at the Allouez-Douglass Shaft (Allouez No.3) sitting outside of New Allouez. We’ve seen this particular angle before, as Bruce Groeneveld took a shot from the same vantage point (see his shot HERE. Obviously a …

A Finnish Church

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When Hancock was first born it consisted of only a dozen blocks bordered on the west by Montezuma Street (currently anchored by the city hall building featured previously) and to the east by Reservation Street and the deep ravine carrying the Quincy Tram. For the villages first few decades of …

News and Views Thursday…

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Todays News and Views brings us back to 1943 – a favorite year of mine apparently. This particular issue’s front page story deals with the sinking of the Allouez No.3 shaft, also know as the Allouez-Douglass shaft. (check out the ruins of the mine today HERE) Interestingly the shaft was …

City Hall

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Hancock was first platted by the Quincy Mining Company in 1859, just a few years after the village of Houghton was incorporated across the lake. While Houghton was conceived independent of a mine company’s control, it would take the young community of Hancock over 15 years to shake off the …

An LL&TL Trestle

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Today we take a quick look at what is somewhat of an oddity here in the Copper Country – a functioning railroad trestle. Though all of the CC’s common carrier and private railroads have all disappeared off the map (along with most of their infrastructure) there does remain one operational …

News & Views Thursdays – Friday Edition

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Due to some server issues beyond my control CCE was temporally out of service for the last couple of days. Because of that I was unable to post my weekly C&H News and Views on its regularly scheduled time. So instead I’m going to post it today, and save myself …

Going a Little Loco

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Two weeks ago my Quincy Roundhouse update post garnered quite a bit of interest, especially in the old No.6 locomotive parked out front. There was some discussion as to the feasibility of its restoration, which according to local railroad guru (that’s my words not his) Chuck Pomazal won’t really be …

An Architectural Beauty

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Today we take a look at one of the Copper Country’s most beautiful buildings – at least in my opinion. Built in 1887 for the great Calumet and Hecla Mining company, this intricately assembled masonry building housed the company’s main administration and clerical offices. Built along the Keweenaw’s main north-south …

The Iroquois That Was

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Apparently at one time it was considered “current” to name your capitalistic embodiment after a native tribe, considering the surplus of such mines scattered along the Keweenaw (the Mohawk, Oneida, Delaware, Huron, Seneca, Ojibway). When C&H decided to open up its newest endeavor north of Mohawk it didn’t want to …

Old Mill Hill Trestle

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It would be the short lived South Pewabic Mine that first laid claim to this steep ridge line that rises up along Canal Road just west of Houghton. The company had planned to pillage the rich Pewabic Lode that the Quincy Mine had so successfully mined across the canal, along …