Monthly Archives: September 2010

C&H News and Views Thursdays

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Another Thursday is upon us and that means another issue of C&H News and Views. This week we jump ahead by a year to July of 1944 – a month after the allied invasion of France. Copper was still in high demand and C&H was still attempting to expand its …

A Last Look Around

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With the Seneca No.1’s main surface structures – the boiler, compressor, and hoist foundations – now behind us it was time to take a final look around and see what else of interest there was to find at the site. Of course there was one major building left on our …

Yet Another Hoist Foundation

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Another day another hoist foundation, that’s what I always say. These guys are like weeds, and everywhere I go I find myself stumbling across yet another one. In the old days (say about four years ago) these were rather exciting to find, especially large concrete types like the one we …

C&H News and Views – now online!

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The great C&H is often remembered in the abstract, as only a ghostly figment from time’s endless memory. To those that study the great copper empire that once existed here the Calumet and Hecla company is more legend then corporation. But as its inevitable shut down and disbandment showed, the …

More Ruins at Seneca

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Next door to the Seneca No.1’s boiler house was another set of concrete ruins. These particular foundations were decorated with several iron bolts protruding up out of their surface – a sign that we were looking at the foundations for some piece of equipment. More specifically these pedestals were once …

An Industrial Landscape

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In response to my call for my fellow explorers out there to contribute to the daily postings here on CCE, Paul Meier has stepped up to the plate dutifully to supply some really amazing pics of the copper empire while it was still in operation. This current batch was taken …

The Seneca Boiler House

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After leaving the pipes and culverts of the Seneca Dam behind, we worked our way through the woods in search of our next destination: the Seneca No.1. Our sources had indicated that the mine should be just a short distance away from the old reservoir, but those sources hadn’t mentioned …

A Short History Of Seneca

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The Seneca Mine began its life during the Copper Country’s adolescence – around 1860. Before then most mines across the peninsula were duds, lit off by excited investors only to fizzle away into nothing. Interest began to fade and new mines were slow in coming. But thanks to the unprecedented …

Seneca Dam

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While most casual visitors of the Copper Country are aware of Seneca Lake, they most likely do not know of its little sister who resides just outside of the small mining location of Seneca. Like its big brother to the west Seneca Pond is man made, formed by impounding a …

Anatomy of an Engine House

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The Mohawk Mine would mine its Kearsarge Lode riches for 34 years, over which time it paid out nearly $15 million dollars to its shareholders. It was one of the region’s more successful operations, so much so that even after its closure during the Great Depression the Copper Range Company …