Monthly Archives: March 2010

The Terraces

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The milling process involved a series of intermediate steps which worked to liberate copper from its poor rock tomb organized into a series of terraced levels. At the top was the first step – stamping – performed by what are essentially steam driven hammers. Next the rock goes into a …

The Stamp Floor

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A stamp mill is typically set atop a terraced foundation that provides stepped levels for the mill’s rock bins, stamps, jigs, and wash tables. This layout allows for the optimal use of gravity in the transportation of the slime throughout the facility and its subsequent ejection into the launders. At …

A Throne Fit for a Turbine

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C&H’s acquisition of the Centennial Mill occurred during consolidation, when the majority of the Copper Country’s independent mines were absorbed by C&H. In the process C&H acquired several industrial properties in addition to the Centennial mill, including two Tamarack Mills, two Osceola Mills, the Dollar Bay smelter, and the Ahmeek …

Rock Bins

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In stark contrast to the rest of the infrastructure built for the incredibly optimistic company, the Arcadian Mine’s stamp mill was a rather modest facility. As originally built the mill was outfitted with only threes stamps, compliment by a collection of 110 jigs and 9 wash tables. Powering this anemic …

The Stack from 1913

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Soon after the Arcadian’s demise its newly rebranded stamp mill – now known as the Centennial Mill – would become the recipient of a modern renovation. A major component of this refit was the addition of 3 more stamp heads to the mill’s original battery of 3, doubling both the …

Along Grosse Point Shores

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At the north end of Portage Lake nestled between its north and west arms sits the Dollar Peninsula – a large outcropping of land which physically sets Torch Lake apart from Portage Lake. Extending into Portage Lake at the peninsula’s southern end is a protrusion of land known as Grosse …

Copper Docks

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Continuing along with those high resolution photos (we’ll go back to regular programming next week) we have a couple of short shots showcasing just one of the region’s many copper docks that were once used to transport the Copper Country’s copper goods across the world. This particular dock belongs to …

A Michigan Smelter

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Here’s another great high-resolution shot of the old Copper Country, this time showcasing the Copper Range’s Michigan Smelter. This massive complex smelted the ore from all of the Copper Range properties (Baltic, Trimountain, Champion) as well as a few other independent mines scattered across the peninsula. The smelter utilized its …

Portage Lake

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I’ve featured this particular photo before here on CCE, but not nearly in such high resolution as it appears today. This is a shot overlooking Portage Lake, as seen from the perspective of the Dollar Peninsula. The structures seen in the center of the photo above belong to the Tamarack …

The Smelter

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A look at the C&H Smelter, as seen in a high-resolution panoramic image taken around 1905 (click on the image to view the full image). The prominent sandstone building in the center of the cropped image above is the smelter’s blast furnace building, otherwise known as the Cupola building. This …

Faces

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A typical collection of underground workers at a Lake Superior copper mine, after arriving to the surface atop a man-car. Taken at Calumet and Hecla’s No.2 Calumet shaft in 1906. By the looks of it there were three main requirements for anyone working underground: a lunch pail, a miner’s cap …

A Streetcar Revisited

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Several years ago during CCE’s informative early years we had come across the remains of an old trolley car rotting away in a field atop St. Louis Hill. For an early CC explorer it was an amazing find, and something completely unexpected and out of the ordinary. Well several years …

In Memory of Isabella..

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“Sacred to the memory of Isabella.. Oldest daughter of Harlow & Jane Everett… Who departed this life Jan. 27 1861… Aged 9 yrs and 8 mo’s… Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord… Weep not for me my parents dear… I am not dead but sleeping here… I …

Agassiz Park (p5)

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The current condition of Agassiz Park can be contributed to two major events in the property’s history, both of which irrevocably altered the park’s character. One of these was the construction by the Calumet Housing Authority of several public housing structures along the park’s east side, a move which destroyed …

Agassiz Park (p4)

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Besides the collection of radial walkways which make their way across the Agassiz Park of today, there is very little else remaining that illustrates the grand vision Warren Manning had for the landscape. The majority of the old park’s property has been replaced by public housing projects, parking lots, roads …

Agassiz Park (p3)

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The Agassiz Park as Warren Manning had envisioned it was a grand public space that reflected the sort of refined urbanism that had come to exemplify the metropolitan nature of Calumet and its surrounding communities. The park was a civilized landscape that countered the wild and rugged condition of the …

Agassiz Park (p2)

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Agassiz Park after decades of abandonment – only a sliver of its former self The ambitious vision that landscape architect Warren Manning put forth for C&H’s Agassiz Park was unfortunately twenty years too late in its application. If the park had been built nearer the turn of the century – …

Agassiz Park (p1)

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Alexander Agassiz was president of the great Calumet & Hecla Mine since nearly its conception, pulling the once struggling enterprise out of a financial abyss and building it into a massively successful company of impressive wealth and power. Agassiz’s influence reached beyond the company itself and extended to the surrounding …