Monthly Archives: February 2010

The Town of Ojibway

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Across the Keweenaw copper mines were often joined by a mining location, a small collection of worker housing built by the mine itself to serve its workforce. In some cases these mining locations outgrew their mine masters to become fully functional towns complete with commercial districts and public services. In …

The Big Picture

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The Ojibway mine was home to two shafts. The northern shaft was known as the No.1, and was sunk at the northern end of the mine’s property. The southern shaft, started several years later, was sunk into an exposed section of barren rock at the mine’s southern end. It was …

Along the Muddy Banks…

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With the remains of the compressor house behind us, we turned our attention eastward back towards the boiler complex and any ruin that may exist beyond. We were one ruin shy of our trifecta, that particular ruin belonging to the mine’s hoist house. Since nothing but road greeted us to …

The Compressor House

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Heading westward in the direction dictated by that old utility tunnel led us to a collection of brick ruins scattered throughout the woods. We couldn’t find any obvious foundation, but these brick platforms looked to belong to some type of steam equipment, something far less expansive then a hoist. Our …

The Ojibway Boiler House

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It was surprising that we hadn’t noticed it before, as large and monolithic as it was. Standing alone and set a few dozen feet away from the rest of the ruins was the brick “cube” seen in the photo above. Though unconventional in both shape and material, we knew what …

The Catacombs

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After leaving behind the foundation to the Blacksmith shop it wasn’t long until we found ourselves face to face with yet another foundation – this one built not from poor rock but bricks. These particular bricks looked like no other bricks we have found before, their brown color and thin …

The Ojibway Mine

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The copper-rich Kearsarge Lode was first discovered in 1882, and within several years enterprising ming companies had acquired mineral rights all along its known outcroppings between Calumet and Ahmeek. At the approach of the 20th century mine managers had believed the extant of the Kearsarge lode had been mapped – …

A Shaft and an Adit

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Perhaps unbeknownst to most CCE readers out there is our policy of not referring to or mentioning any open mine shafts that we happen to come across during our excursions. This hasn’t always been the case, and you can still find some older posts which still talk about and showcase …

A Paavola Homestead

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Sitting along the northern outskirts of Quincy Hill is the small farming community of Paavola – a village with a rather interesting history. The lands on which Paavola now sits were originally owned by the Franklin Mine, which spun off a satellite mining company in 1864. That mine was the …

A Whealkate Homestead

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For the most part the majority of the Keweenaw Peninsula was owned by mine companies, land acquired for either its mineral or lumber riches. For those mines with good fortune – such as C&H or Quincy – these lands were often converted into company housing and rented out to their …

The Limerick Church

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This interesting old church sits alone and abandoned near the Quincy Mine, in what use to be a small community of worker housing known as Limerick. Its hodgepodge collection of field stone, sandstone, and brick looks almost folksy – as if the building was built by hand by a local …

That Which Survives (p2)

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As first built, the Isle Royale’s original surface plant consisted of a series of rather small wood-framed buildings set upon stone foundations. These buildings included a dry house, machine shop, blacksmith shop, and carpenter shop, each built to almost the same specifications. By 1917 this arrangement had become incapable of …

That Which Survives (p1)

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For the most part copper mines along the Keweenaw erected very modest surface plants, directing most of their money into the actual work of mining. Surface improvements were often considered wasteful embellishments, especially by investors looking to get large returns on their money. Mining was were money could be made, …