Monthly Archives: September 2009

A Pillar

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Before moving on from the Isle Royale No. 4 boiler house, there was one other thing that caught our eye hidden deep in the woods. From afar it looked like a concrete pillar, a good five feet square and standing about a dozen feet in height. It was like nothing …

The No.4 Boiler House

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The small town of Dodgeville just south of Houghton was conceived – like all Copper Country towns – by a nearby mine. This particular mine was the Dodge, a failure of a property that never developed into anything greater then a few exploration pits. It wasn’t until the Isle Royale …

The Hoist in the Swamp

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Though the Dry House was the first building to catch our eyes after leaving the Rock House remains, it was not the first building we ended up looking for. According to the standard operating procedure for CC exploring (at least in my book) the hoist always follows the shaft/rock house …

The Boiler in the Jungle

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Boiler houses have been – and continue to be – the most annoying ruin I have ever had the displeasure of attempting to document here at CCE. On the ground the remains of these structures boil down to (no pun intended) a couple trenches and a some shallow concrete pedestals. …

An Isle Royale Dry House

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With the shaft and rockhouse taken care of, it was now time to search for the remaining pieces of the puzzle, namely the shaft’s complimentary structures such as the boiler, compressor, hoist and dry houses. Most of these were no were to be seen from our vantage point at the …

The Isle Royale No.6

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Isle Royale No. 6 The Isle Royale Mine originally opened in 1852, on a section of the Isle Royale lode squeezed between the Grand Portage to the north and the Huron on the south. By 1854 the mine was joined by a small stamp mill, joined to the mine by …

The Isle Royale Dock

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The growth and development of many communities up and down the Keweenaw was molded by the success or failure of an adjacent mine. For Calumet it was the massively successful C&H that pulled their strings. For Hancock it was the Quincy. For Houghton it would be the Isle Royale. Though …

An Abandoned Osceola Location

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The South Hecla Shafts and Mineral Range Roundhouse – as seen from atop the Osceola No.1 Conglomerate shaft house The Osceola Mine began its illustrious life with a desperate attempt to reap the riches of the great Calumet Conglomerate Lode – a lode that had proved enormously successful for the …

A Traprock Valley Railroad Trestle

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The Ahmeek Mine – a C&H prize from consolidation It was in 1923 that C&H’s dominance over the Copper Country reached its peak, resulting in its takeover of nearly every independent mine still operating in the Calumet region. Under its new “consolidated” moniker, C&H was now in complete control of …

The Bowling Stone

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If you spend any time scouring the Keweenaw shore you are bound to find them, scattered seemingly randomly across rocky outcroppings and rugged cliffs. They are drill holes, driven into the shore by the peninsula’s early copper prospectors. I’m not exactly sure why they exist, or for what purpose. They …

Guest Post: The Franklin Jr No.2

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This is the second guest post by fellow copper country explorer Brian Wereley, who has been kind enough to send me photos and commentary relating to his exploration of the Franklin Jr mine early this past spring. As I have noted before, CCE is open to anyone who wants to …

Scrapbook IX (p2)

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Continuing from where we left off yesterday, here’s a few more panoramic images taken by the Detroit Publishing Company back at the turn of the century. Remember to click on the picture itself to view the annotated panoramic! Here’s an interesting look down the Portage from the vantage point of …

Scrapbook IX (p1)

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Did some browsing through one of my favorite web sites yesterday – the Library of Congress American Memory site – and stumbled across a collection of photos from the Detroit Publishing Company. The Detroit Publishing Company was a photographic publishing firm established in the late 1890’s by a Detroit publisher …