Monthly Archives: August 2009

The Communities of Calumet

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The village of Calumet as we have come to know it today has only existed since 1929. Up until then the small village was known as Red Jacket, with Calumet itself nothing more then the designation of the region’s post office. To the local population “Calumet” was more accurately a …

In Memory of Hays

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If you drive along Cliff Drive enough you’re bound to discover a large boulder sitting along the shoulder just west of the Cliff Mine itself, a boulder that has etched in its face a distinct rectangular depression. The depression is no doubt for a plaque of some type, no doubt …

One Last Look…

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The LaSalle No.1 Rock House – which we didn’t find Unfortunately there was not a large amount of ruins left at LaSalle No.1, so our exploration of that shaft was short lived. From there we headed out across the rock field in search for the old Mineral Range grade that …

Slivers of LaSalle No.1

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LaSalle No.1 – otherwise known as Tecumseh No.1 – sits about 1800 feet north of the No.2. While there was once a spur of the Mineral Range railroad connecting the two mines, its old grade had been obliterated by whoever bulldozed the No.2’s rock pile. Instead we took a stroll …

LaSalle No.2 – the Leftovers

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Before moving on from our exploration of LaSalle No.2 we’ll take one last look at some of the odd’s and ends we found along the way. These are ruins and remnants that were not substantial enough by themselves to warrant their own post, but were significant enough to mention. Consider …

The No.2 Boiler

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While it may of been true that the current hoist foundation we found at LaSalle No.2 was an electric model, it was also apparent with the discovery of these next set of ruins that the old No.2 was once served by a classic steam model as well. It was just …

What Was Once Tecumseh No.2

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LaSalle No.2, previously known as Tecumseh No.2 The LaSalle Mine was a combination of two older mines – the Tecumseh and the Caldwell – that had simply taken those older shafts as its own (with some new numbering). The LaSalle held a total of 4 shafts, two on the Tecumseh …

The LaSalle Powder House

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The LaSalle Mine begin its life in 1880 as the Tecumseh, a struggling mine south of Osceola that made several failed attempts to mine both the Calumet and Osceola lodes. The mine’s prospects incredibly brightened with its effort at the Kearsarge Lode, where it sunk two shafts near the turn …

An Abandoned Outhouse

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One of the more disturbing developments in the Copper Country is the abandonment and dismantlement of old-time public spaces and parks. The most egregious example of this is Agassiz Park, which was gutted and dismembered by the village in the name of affordable housing. Granted this example is extreme, in …

The Spillway at Calumet Dam

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The first Calumet Dam was built by beavers, which had created a small pond to the north of Red Jacket years before the Calumet Mine arrived to the scene. When the fledging mine looked to build its first stamp mill this small impoundment became the obvious choice due to its …

The Hydrant

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To me some of the most illustrative examples of the Copper Country’s fall from grace is the faded and forgotten hydrants we find sitting alone in an overgrown field or deep in the shade of a forest. It’s a powerful image that seems to singularly incapsulate the fall of a …