Monthly Archives: May 2009

A Mineral Range Oil House

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The Mineral Range Railroad began its life in 1873 as a short 14 mile line connecting Hancock and Calumet. In this original configuration the majority of the railroad’s surface structures were located in Hancock, including its locomotive house and machine shops. But over the years the line expanded to cover …

A C&H Trestle

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It was November of 1887 that a major fire swept through the Calumet Conglomerate workings at C&H. Due to C&H’s heavy use of timbering underground, the fire spread quickly and was soon large enough to force the closure of the entire mine. Shafts were sealed in the hoped to smother …

The Swedetown Bridge

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It was during the height of the Civil War that mine companies – including C&H – found themselves with a shortage of able-bodied men to work the underground. In response agents were dispatched to Scandinavian countries with the promise of free passage to America for anyone willing to work in …

A Pump House and Crib

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The first Calumet Mill was a short lived diversion in what was otherwise an illustrious and profitable career for C&H. The roller’s that Agassiz had originally installed in the mill quickly proved inadequate in crushing the hard amygdaloid rock that the mine was encountering. Soon those rollers were replaced with …

The Calumet Mill Boiler House (p2)

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The Calumet Pond – used to supply water to the Calumet Mill The Calumet Mill was almost the end for the great C&H, before it could even get off the ground. Calumet’s manager – Hulbert – had resisted the construction of a proper mill for the mine for some time. …

The Calumet Mill Boiler House (p1)

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Before merging to form the great C&H, the Calumet and Hecla mines were in fact two separate entities. It was in 1866 that the corporate life of the Calumet was first forged, and the company was put under the leadership of Edwin Hulbert – the man who first discovered the …

A Stone Boat

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Brockway Mountain Drive, one of the several projects built during the Depression Like most of the country, the Copper Country was devastated by the economic calamity unleashed by the Great Depression. In wake of the turmoil copper prices plummeted, and the high profits companies had been enjoying evaporated almost overnight. …

Scrapbook VII

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Its been a little slow lately with submissions for CCE’s Copper Country Scrapbook series, but the arrival of some great photos from contributer Bruce Groeneveld last week prompted me to throw together another chapter. We begin with those very same photos from Mr. Groeneveld… Bruce sent me these photos in …