Monthly Archives: February 2009

The Shore Plant

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The Quincy Reclamation Plant was in fact two plants in one. The main plant sat up on shore, and was home to the series of ball mills, Wilfley tables, and floatation tanks used in the actual reclamation process. Responsibility for getting the stamp sands to that plant belonged to a …

Rails On Water

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After having been sucked up from the lake bottom by the dredge, stamp sands were then sent down along the pontoon line to shore to began the reclamation process. From our vantage point out near the old pontoon line we could see in the distance the bleached white remains of …

Crates in the Sand

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Making our way from the sunken dredge we embarked on a long journey across the Quincy stamp sands towards the Reclamation Plant. Like most other sand deposits in the region these have been recently “rehabilitated” by the government – essentially covering the sands with dirt and planting various types of …

The Mining of Torch Lake

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The archaic Quincy stamp mill Early stamp methodology was a very simple and archaic one – nothing more than a simple process of smashing rock down into small pieces and sorting out the copper. Everything that remained would then be dumped into tailing ponds as waste. In the Copper Country …

Keweenaw Sands Redux

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As some of you might have noticed the posts here on CCE have slowed down dramatically and have been sporadic at best. The reason for this is the amount of time I have been devoting to those historic maps I’ve mentioned in the past. In the process of my research …

Old Schools of the Copper Country (p3)

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The comforting arm of corporate paternalism wrapped itself around almost all aspects of community life in the Copper Country – including that of public education. While on paper school systems were municipally run and controlled by elected board-members, the heavy influence of the mine companies was palpable. Rural schools may …

Old Schools of the Copper Country (p2)

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While the Copper Country had its fair share of rural schools thanks to its Finnish immigrants, most schools in the region were found within the various towns and villages scattered across the peninsula. As the Copper Country grew and prospered, it wasn’t only single young men who called the area …

Old Schools of the Copper Country (p1)

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The history of the American rural education system has always been tied closely with the agriculture industry. Those rural folks making a living off the land the education of their children was usually subservient to the work required for a successful fall harvest. Children were often more useful to the …