Monthly Archives: August 2008

Anatomy of a Mill (p1)

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In the beginning of the Copper Empire, very little importance was put on milling. It was the mines themselves that produced copper, usually in the form of large pieces known as mass (or barrel) copper. These large pieces required no milling, and fetched high prices out east. Milling at that …

Keweenaw Sands (p3)

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The steam stamp technology that helped propel an industry into profitable territory required large amounts of water to function – somewhere in the vicinity of millions of gallons a day. This forced more modern mines to place their mills near the only sources of water large enough to supply these …

Keweenaw Sands (p2)

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A look at the early Frankling and Pewabic stamp mills along Portage Lake Exactly where a mine built its stamp mill was determined by three main factors: availability of water, room for the disposal of tailings, and proximity to the mine itself. For those mines sprouting up along the steep …

Keweenaw Sands (p1)

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The Isle Royale stamp sands (lower right), as seen in 1940 from the air. Mining is not the most environmentally friendly industry (and let’s face it, what industry really is?), and the scars it leaves on the landscape often outlast by generations those mines and mine managers that were responsible …

Red Sands

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It was 1869 that the Allouez Mine began operations atop Bumbletown Hill, sinking a trio of shafts into what would become known as the Allouez Conglomerate bed. With the mine came a need for a mill, and the company turned to the nearest source of water it could find: the …

The Removal of the Osceola #13 Hoist

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Over at the Copper Country Forums long-time reader Jay had shared a rumor he had heard about the removal of the hoist from Osceola #13. At first I didn’t believe it. Since I knew that a new business was moving into the old Centennial No. 6 surface plant, I assured …

Yes Virginia, There Is an Old Seneca…

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After our little discussion the other day on the mysteries of the Seneca Mine and its many names and faces I decided to head on out there to try to clear up at least one of those mysteries – specifically dealing with the existence of the Seneca Mine as marked …

A Mine By Any Other Name…

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It all started with this – this Bat Cage sitting atop a mine shaft out at the Gratiot Location. When I first noticed this steel contraption along the side of the highway so many years ago I had assumed that this shaft was a Gratiot shaft. That would seem to …