Monthly Archives: May 2008

To All the Hoists I’ve Known Before

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Me and hoist foundations go way back. I can still remember my first – it was a rather small red-brick beauty hiding away in brush along Tecumseh Road. Her name was Osceola No. 4, and her signature “H” figure is something I’ll never be able to forget. From that point …

Mesnard Compressor House

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After yesterday’s first post on our Mesnard exploration, readers pointed out the existence of a large group of ruins sitting just behind the modern structures we had featured. I had noticed those same ruins on aerial images myself (highlighted on the image above) before heading out on the trail, and …

A Modern Mesnard

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After Quincy bought up the defunct Mesnard Mine in 1896 it re-opened one of its original shafts, which became Quincy No. 8. Quincy then erected atop of it a modern shaft-rock-house – but not as modern as the one that currently stands there today. The iron head-frame that stands over …

Tamarack Mills (in color)

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While spending some much needed time cleaning out my inbox here at CCE, I stumbled across a collection of photos sent to me by Bruce Groeneveld of the Tamarack Mills (Tamarack City) in the early ’70’s. It was amazing to me to see the area with the Ahmeek Mill still …

A Dam Mystery

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Fresh from my week-long Strep ordeal (much better now thankfully) I find an interesting mystery waiting for me in my inbox. Brian Wereley had just returned from a Copper Country Exploration of his own, where he had found what looks to be an old dam hiding away in the woods. …

The Mineral Range Revisited

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the remains of a Mineral Range dual-gauge track near Mesnard For railroad fans, the Keweenaw is a treasure trove of material. Besides the dozen’s of short line railroads that were built to service various mines (The H&TL and Q&TL being the most popular) there were also a collection of larger …

More Quincy Rock Cars

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I would have to admit that after three years of exploring the Copper Country there isn’t too much that surprises me anymore. Hoist foundation? Check. Boiler Stack foundation? Check. Rock House foundation? Check. The list is the same each time, almost no matter where I go. But then there are …

Along the Old Pewabic (p3)

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Before the acquisition of the Pewabic Mine, Quincy operated only two shafts set only a few hundred feet apart. Because of this they only needed one centralized dry house to service both. The system worked wonderfully for years until Quincy opened their No. 6 shaft along the old Pewabic property. …

Along the Old Pewabic (p2)

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When Quincy acquired the Pewabic Mine it inherited an obsolete and dilapidated surface plant consisting of an old shaft/rock house, hoist house, a few carpentry shops and a boiler house. Quincy re-used as much as they could, but a few new buildings had be built for its new No. 6 …

Along the Old Pewabic (p1)

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If it wasn’t for the discovery of the Pewabic Lode by Quincy’s northern neighbor, “old reliable” may have never survived its misfortunes along the Quincy Lode. It didn’t take Quincy long to find the Pewabic’s extension onto its property and begin sinking shafts to exploit it. But while the Pewabic …

Of Rock and Sandstone…

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Out of the four main components of any mine (rock-house, shaft-house, hoist house, boiler house) the boiler house has by far been the most elusive to photograph. For a time we hadn’t come across the remains of a single one, until our discovery at North Kearsarge introduced us to these …

The Quincy Shafts

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For most mines along the Keweenaw shaft numbering was simple. The first shaft you sunk was the No. 1. Every shaft after that was named sequentially – working your way along the lode. Going from north to south, or vice versa, you would have the No.1, followed by the No. …