Monthly Archives: April 2008

Quincy No. 4

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For most of Quincy’s early history the vast majority of its production came out of only two shafts – the NO. 2 and NO. 4. While it had originally opened up nine shafts along the copper-rich Pewabic lode, most were abandoned rather quickly once poorer ground was discovered. Because of …

No. 4 Boiler House (and Man-shaft)

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Before the acquisition of the Pewabic Mine (which became North Quincy), the Quincy Mine consisted of a total of nine shafts. As time progressed and technology improved Quincy closed down most of these shafts and concentrated its efforts on only three: the no. 2, no. 4, and no. 7. In …

A Quincy Dry (p2)

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Attached to the south end of the dry house was a second much larger building. If it wasn’t in ruin it would appear to be simply part of the rest of the structure, but in it’s current state you could see that the attached structure had a second floor (or …

A Quincy Dry House (p1)

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One of the most celebrated and successful mines along the Keweenaw was “old reliable” atop Quincy hill. For almost a century and a half the mine produced 1.5 billion pounds of copper and paid its shareholders over 30 million dollars in dividends. But the mine’s reputation today ignores its very …

Of Architectural Interest

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Recently while working on research for another web site, I had come across an excellent web site about Copper Country Architecture put together by the Social Science department at Michigan Tech. The site provides biographies of prominent are architects as well as detailed descriptions of their Copper Country work. Its …

Quincy Turbine Illustrated

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While doing some spring cleaning around here I stumbled across a collection of drawings I did of the Quincy Stamp Mill Turbine Building. This building was built in 1921, to supply electric power to the Quincy Mills. Housed inside was a 2000 kw General Electric steam turbine, powered by the …

How to ID a Shaft

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Its that time of year again when people – suffering from great bouts of cabin fever – venture out into the Keweenaw backwoods in search of old mine ruins to explore. With the leaves not yet on the trees and the snow melting – these ruins are easier to find …

Scrapbook V: Inside Centennial

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Our discussion of the Centennial here as of late has gotten a lot of attention out there in reader-ville. It seems that almost everyone has a Centennial Mine experience out there and want to share. After I featured Jay’s photos earlier in the week, I received a panoramic image of …

Centennial No. 3 Panoramic

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click on the image to view a panoramic of the Centennial No. 3 grounds, photographed by a fellow explorer After yesterday’s feature on the Centennial No. 3 (as photographed by Jay Balliet), I got a few more photos of the site in my inbox. This has got to be the …

Copper Country Scrapbook IV

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Today for Copper Country Scrapbook I present the Centennial No. 3 – as seen by fellow explorer Jay Balliet. He’s taken a great deal of photos of this baby, which is a good thing since we haven’t gotten out to it yet. Although I’ve featured its big brother on this …

Copper Country Stacks

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The prevalent use of steam power for most of the Copper Country’s history meant the need for a boiler house to provide that steam. That in turn meant the presence of a smokestack. Up until the installation of electric hoists (after the Second World War), every mine and mill along …

Mohawk Mill Pump House

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This post was originally written not knowing that the ruins here are in fact those of the Mohawk Mill’s Pump House. Scroll down for an update Sitting just outside of Gay – north of the vast expanse of stamp sands along the shore – the fast and shallow Tobacco river …

The Albion Rock

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the location of the legendary Albion Rock? If Copper Country explorers like myself can be likened to a real-life Indiana Jones, then the famous Albion Rock is our Ark of the Covenant. Stories of its existence are shrouded in myth and mystery, passed down from one explorer to the next. …