Monthly Archives: September 2007

Back to the Roundhouse

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We return today to the Quincy & Torch Lake Roundhouse – at least what’s left of it. Since our last visit to the site over a year ago some more rehabilitation work has been undertaken on the structure. Along with a great deal of the other ruins at Quincy, the …

Yet Another Powder House

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we find another powder house, this time outside of the Ahmeek No. 2 We have seen a few of these buildings, and we could tell almost right away what it was for once we stumbled across it. The thick walls, lack of windows, and vents over the doors all point …

The Power Plant (p3)

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Making my way up to the top floor of the Turbine Building I found myself inside a concrete cathedral rising high above my head. This was a cavernous room a good two and a half stories in height with no internal support columns messing up the view. High above me …

The Power Plant (p2)

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Making our way inside the towering structure of the turbine building we find ourselves in what must have been the buildings basement. Even with the large window openings gracing three of the walls, the entire floor was very dark and damp. Standing in the middle of the room was four …

The Power Plant (p1)

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sticking up from the trees stand the remains to the Quincy Mill’s turbine building, used to supply electricity to the mill There might have been no other place that celebrated steam power as flamboyantly then the Copper Country. Here almost everything was powered by steam, hoisting engines, stamps, trains, pumps, …

Cuts, Fills, Trestles and Rails

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part of the old trestle once used to deliver copper rock to the mill The copper rock stored in the large holding bins here at the back of the Quincy Mill was delivered by train, courtesy the Quincy and Torch Lake Railroad. These trains travelled from the mine up atop …

The Mill’s Wooden Half

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the Quincy Mill before the addition of the addition As originally built the new mill at Mason was built much like all other mills along the copper range; a wooden structure, built down a hillside in a step stair fashion. Building along a hillside allowed gravity to do most of …

Mill Machines: Dorr Thickener

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In order to further improve the milling process along the Copper Country mine companies began to turn to newly developed chemical processes for use in their mills. While the purity of Copper Country Copper did not necessarily require such measures (knocking off all the non-copper rock from the copper was …

The Second Floor

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Before leaving the second floor of the stamp mill we take a few more wide looks at what remains. At this point the new addition, built from brick and concrete, butts up against the original mill built from wood. The wood structure has long since disintegrated, which leaves an obvious …

Mill Machines: The Wilfley Table

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For most of the Copper Country’s history the milling process has been very inefficient. For every ton of copper recovered, dozens of pounds more slipped past and found its way to the waste launders. At the Quincy mills the process was so inefficient that the company was able to live …